XV.

To the End, Courage

After Franklin Roosevelt's death, admirers as well as detractors had assumed—as she had herself—that Eleanor Roosevelt would gradually fade from public sight into "a private and inconspicuous existence." Yet of all of Roosevelt's associates, she had become more rather than less of a public eminence. Henry Morgenthau came to her upset because he had gone to the White House and had not been recognized. "Don't you know that if you are out of the limelight three days they will forget you?" she comforted him, adding, "they will forget me too." They did not. The leading woman in the Roosevelt administration, Frances Perkins, was given refuge in her final years at the Cornell School of Industrial Relations. Miss Perkins was never wholly reconciled to the contrast between herself, almost forgotten after President Roosevelt's death, and Mrs. Roosevelt, who had moved onto a world stage and was functioning as a world figure. Why Eleanor Roosevelt did not even have an intellectually tidy mind, she confided to her Cornell associates. 1

Tidy mind or not, Eleanor Roosevelt had a right to feel, as she did, that she had made a success of her professional career and had done so on her own. Sixteen years after her husband's death she continued to be America's "Most Admired Woman," more popular than Jacqueline Kennedy, Queen Elizabeth, Mrs. Dwight Eisenhower, Clare Luce, and Mme. Chiang Kai-shek. Her professional income in 1961 totaled more than $100,000, of which lecture fees accounted for $33,500, her writing close to $60,000, her column $7,794, and Brandeis University paid her $6,500. 2

"When you cease to make a contribution you begin to die," she wrote in her seventy-fifth year. "Therefore, I think it a necessity to

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eleanor: The Years Alone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eleanor: the Years Alone *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Author's Note *
  • Preface *
  • I - Champion of Her Husband's Ideals *
  • II - The Hardest-Working Delegate *
  • III - A Magna Charta for Mankind *
  • IV - Reluctant Cold -Warrior *
  • V - The United Nations and a Jewish Homeland *
  • VI - The 1948 Campaign: a New Party—not a Third Party *
  • VII - Cardinal and Former First Lady *
  • VIII - An American Phenomenon *
  • IX - America's Best Ambassador *
  • X - Resignation Accepted *
  • XI - Private Citizen Again *
  • XII - "Madly for Adlai" *
  • XIII - Two Bosses—khrushchev and De Sapio *
  • XIV - A New Generation Takes Over *
  • XV - To the End, Courage *
  • Appendix A: - Eleanor Roosevelt and the Nobel Peace Prize *
  • Appendix B: - Mrs. Roosevelt and the Sultan of Morocco *
  • References *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.