Dealing with Dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

By Brian Draper | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
TYPES OF DEMENTIA

THERE ARE OVER 100 established types of dementia, but most of them are extremely rare. In this chapter I will describe the four main types of dementia seen in clinical practice—Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, which account for 90 to 95 per cent of all cases—and a number of the less common types, as listed in Table 5.1.

In the previous chapters I have outlined the common risk factors for dementia and described the clinical features, albeit with a particular focus on Alzheimer's disease. Here my focus is on what is understood about why these disorders occur, and the specific features that distinguish them from each other.

Apart from vascular dementia, most of the dementias are categorised as neurodegenerative disorders because, essentially, they involve the progressive degeneration and death of nerve cells. There is now mounting evidence for a common theme uniting these disorders. In a nutshell, neurodegenerative disorders are fundamentally caused by the abnormal accumulation of insoluble proteins in the brain. These proteins are toxic and exert a deleterious effect on selective nerve cells, impairing their function and eventually leading to cell death. The abnormal proteins also affect synapses (spaces) between nerve cells, hence the chemical information between cells might not be transmitted properly and nerve circuits might be interrupted. 1 This is a fast moving area with new discoveries happening almost every week. I concentrate on what seems to be reasonably well accepted by the scientific community rather than on what remains speculative.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dealing with Dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations x
  • List of Tables xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter 1 - What is Dementia 1
  • Chapter 2 - Prevention of Dementia I 12
  • Chapter 3 - Prevention of Dementia II 26
  • Chapter 4 - The Symptoms and Course of Dementia 45
  • Chapter 5 - Types of Dementia 71
  • Chapter 6 - Dementia Assessment 88
  • Chapter 7 - Drug Treatments 106
  • Chapter 8 - Psychosocial Treatments 123
  • Chapter 9 - Families and Other Carers 138
  • Chapter 10 - Community Care Services 154
  • Chapter 11 - Residential Care 170
  • Chapter 12 - Ethical and Legal Issues 188
  • Chapter 13 - The Future 204
  • Appendix 1 - Australian Telephone Helplines 220
  • Appendix 2 - Websites 222
  • Appendix 3 - Books for Carers 230
  • Glossary 232
  • Notes 238
  • Index 252
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 255

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.