The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal

By Lynne Kelly | Go to book overview

14
THE PROPHECY THAT IS KABUL KHAN

Much is made of Nostradamus and his legendary ability to foresee the future. I maintain that much can be made of any vague and obscure piece of prose or poetry. I hereby offer a modest example.

In 1798 Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote ‘Kubla Khan’. I believe Coleridge not only describes the war in Afghanistan, but tells us quite clearly where Osama bin Laden is in hiding.

What is Kubla? Coleridge saw his great vision in a druginduced sleep. It is obvious that he was referring to the capital city of Afghanistan, an anagram of those very letters: Kabul.

And Khan? Confirming the naming of Kabul, Khan refers to the very man who declared the province of Kabul in 1901 and ruled the great nation as its monarch: Amir Habibullah Khan. Do you really believe the title Kubla Khan can be a mere coincidence given these astounding facts?

In reading the poem, with the knowledge that this is a premonition, we can see with ease the warning we should have received.

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea.

-150-

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The Skeptic's Guide to the Paranormal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 - Spontaneous Human Conbustion 1
  • 2 - Walking on Hot Coals 8
  • 3 - Crop Circles 12
  • 4 - The Shround of Turin 20
  • 5 - Psychic Readings 34
  • 6 - Spiritualism 49
  • 7 - Ghosts and Poltergeists 71
  • 8 - Diy Ghost Photos 80
  • 9 - Reincarnation and Past Lives 83
  • 10 - Astrology 102
  • 11 - Numerology 115
  • 12 - Esp—extrasensory Perception 125
  • 13 - Nostradamus 143
  • 14 - The Prophecy That is Kabul Khan 150
  • 15 - Psychic Detectives 154
  • 16 - Diy Telepathy 161
  • 17 - Psychics on Stage 164
  • 18 - Diy Bending Spoons 175
  • 19 - Ufo Emconters of the First Kind—sightings 178
  • 20 - Ufo Encounters of the Second Kind—physical Evidence 198
  • 21 - UFO Encounters of the Third Kind—allen Contact 207
  • 22 - Alien Abductions 217
  • 23 - The Beermuda Triangle 226
  • 24 - Levitation 233
  • 25 - Dowsing and Divining 244
  • 26 - Yeti, Bigfoot and Other Ape-Mem 251
  • 27 - The Loch Mess Monster 256
  • Acknowledgments 261
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