A Teacher's Guide to Education Law

By Michael Imber; Tyll Van Geel | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Many aspects of the law of education have changed during the ten years since the first edition of A Teacher's Guide to Education Law was published. This third edition has been extensively updated and revised to reflect the changes, but its goal remains the same: to provide public school teachers with the legal knowledge necessary to do their jobs.

The text is organized to reflect the variety of legal problems that elementary and secondary school teachers actually face. The focus is on the law relating to students, teachers, and school programs. The greater the likelihood of litigation, legal controversy, or error in a particular area of professional practice, the more extensive the discussion. Topics that have been added or significantly expanded or revised in this edition include (among many others): the No Child Left Behind Act, student rights especially in the areas of free speech and search and seizure, employment discrimination, racial and sexual harassment of students and school employees, affirmative action and voluntary school integration, issues relating to the use of the Internet, school investigation and surveillance of teachers and other employees, and the law relating to special student populations.

Every effort has been made to make the book comprehensible to readers with little or no background in law. The text is written in a style that teacher should find familiar. When technical legal terms are used, their meaning is explained. Discussions of particularly complex topics begin with an overview, and subsequent sections provide additional detail. The last section of each chapter provides a summary of the most significant topics and principles discussed. The first chapter is devoted to providing a foundation for understanding the remainder of the book, including a thorough explanation of the system of legal citations employed.

One of the difficulties of producing a comprehensive treatment of education law designed for teachers throughout the United States is that legal principles and interpretations can vary significantly from state to state. No attempt has been made to review the laws of each state exhaustively. Rather, the text focuses on generally applicable principles, noting areas where the specifics of state law vary. In these areas, readers may want to supplement the material presented with statutes and cases from their own state.

-xv-

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A Teacher's Guide to Education Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • About the Authors *
  • Contents in Brief ix
  • Contents xi
  • Preface xv
  • Chapter 1 - Understanding Education Law 1
  • Chapter 2 - Curriculum 15
  • Notes 45
  • Chapter 3 - Student Free Speech Rights 48
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 4 - Student Discipline 75
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 5 - Equal Educational Opportunity: Race and Gender 103
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 6 - Students with Special Needs 139
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 7 - Federal Constitutional and Statutory Rights of Teachers 169
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 8 - Teacher Employment 211
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 9 - Collective Bargaining, Unions, and Teacher Contracts 232
  • Notes *
  • Chapter 10 - Torts 255
  • Notes *
  • The Constitution of the United States of America 295
  • Table of Cases 299
  • Index 321
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