War and Society in Imperial Rome, 31 BC-AD 284

By Brian Campbell | Go to book overview

NOTES

1

THE ORIGINS OF WAR

1
Ferguson, in Raaflaub and Rosenstein (1999, 427, n. 3). I take ‘material’ to include winning prestige and renown and maintaining status.
2
Momigliano (1966), esp. 120-4, traced this problem back to Greek writers and their view that war was inevitable, whereas constitutions, which could be changed, were a suitable area of study for philosophers and political historians. Furthermore, ancient writers did not pursue the social, moral and economic aspects of warfare.
3
Note particularly Andreski (1968), Marwick (1974, esp. 3-6), Keegan (1976, 1987, 1993), Holmes (1985), Paret (1992). Ferguson, in Raaflaub and Rosenstein (1999), esp. 389-94, 402-14, 423-7, provides a good survey of the causes of war from an anthropological perspective. Modern parallels are used carefully to good effect for the later Roman Republic by Patterson, in Rich and Shipley (1993). See also Garlan (1975, 180-8).
4
Livy (9.17.3), referring to the Republic. For Romans as the sons of Mars, see below, n. 72.
5
Pro Murena, 75.
6
For the history and development of the army of the early Republic, see Keppie (1984).
7
See Polybius, 6.14.10-11.
8
The mentality of ordinary soldiers is discussed by Harris (1979, 41-53). There was possibly a change of feeling in the 150s BC with garrison duty in Macedonia and longer, less profitable wars.
9
Fergus Millar (1984, 1986, 1998) has argued against the conventional view, emphasizing the sovereignty of the Roman people, often expressed through public meetings.
10
See Harris (1979, 9-41).
11
ibid.; see also 1984.
12
For discussion, see Sherwin-White (1980), North (1981), Rich, in Rich and Shipley (1993), who dispute some of Harris’s conclusions. It is doubtless right to avoid schematic solutions. Wars came about for a variety of complex reasons, any one of which could be uppermost on any one occasion.
13
Plutarch, Crassus, 2.
14
Sallust believed that Caesar wanted a new war in which his virtus could shine out (Catiline, 54.4); see Brunt, Roman Imperial Themes (1990, 309-14).
15
Cornell, in Rich and Shipley (1993, 154-60), argued that major imperialistic ventures became increasingly rare in the last century of the Republic. But, as he admits, there were still some spectacular campaigns, and the putting down

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War and Society in Imperial Rome, 31 BC-AD 284
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgements x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • 1 - The Origins of War 1
  • 2 - Soldiers and War 22
  • 3 - The Nature of War 47
  • 4 - War and the Community 77
  • 5 - War and Politics 106
  • 6 - War and Public Opinion 122
  • 7 - Epilogue 151
  • Brief Chronological Table 155
  • Notes 157
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.