International Handbook of Curriculum Research

By William F. Pinar | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Alausa, Y. A. (1999, September). Teacher's feedback through the learners: Acase of my biology class. Reform Forum, 10.

Amukugo, E. M. (1993). Education and politics in Namibia: Past trends and future prospects. Windhoek, Namibia: New Namibia Books.

Amukushu, A. K. (1999). Developing cross-curricular themes from storytelling in grade one. In K. Zeichner & L. Dahlstrom (Eds. ), Democratic teacher education reform in Africa: The case of Namibia (pp. 198–206). Boulder, CO: Westview.

Association for the Development of Education in Africa. (2001). What works and what's new in African education: Africa speaks. London: Author.

Association for the Development of Education in Africa. (1999). Curriculum reform and development in Namibia reflecting equity, access and quality. London: Author.

Atkinson, N. D. (1978). Teaching Rhodesians. London: Longman.

Atkinson, N. D., Agere, T., & Mambo, M. N. (1993). A sector analysis of education in Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe: UNICEF.

Chikombah, C. E. M., Chivore, B. R. S., Maravanyika, O. E., Nyagura, L. M., & Sibanda, I. M., (1999). Review of education sector analysis in Zimbabwe 1990–1996. Paris: Working Group on Education Sector Analysis.

Chung, F., & Ngara, E. (1985). Socialism, education and development: A challenge to Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe: Zimbabwe Publishing House.

Cohen, C. (1994). Administering colonial education in Namibia: The colonial period to the present. Windhoek, Namibia: Namibia Scientific Society.

Creative Associates International. (1990). Final evaluation: Basic education and skills training sector assistance program, Zimbabwe. Washington, DC: Author.

Dahlstrom, L. (Ed. ). (2000). Perspectives on teacher education and transformation in Namibia. Windhoek, Namibia: Gamsberg Macmillan Publishers.

Ellis, J. (1984). Education, repression and liberation: Namibia. London: Catholic Institute for International Relations and the World University Service.

Fair, K. (1994, September 22). Passing and failing learners: Policies and practices in Ondangwa and Rundu in grades 1 to 3. Ministry of Education and Culture and UNICEF, with support from UNICEF and the MEC/Florida State University Project, Volume II.

Gustafsson, I. (1988). Work as education—perspectives on the role of work in current educational reform in Zimbabwe. In J. Lauglo & K. Lillis (Eds. ), Vocationalizing education—an international perspective. Oxford, England: Pergamon.

Harber, C. (1985). Weapon of war: Political education in Zimbabwe. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 17 (2), 163–174.

Harber, C. (1997). Education, democracy and political development in Africa. Brighton, England: Sussex Academic Press.

Harlech-Jones, B. (1998). Viva English! Or is it time to review language policy in education? Reform Forum, 6.

Hungwe, K. N. (1992). Issues in computer-oriented innovations in Zimbabwean education. In S. G. Lewis &J. Samoff(Eds. ), Micro-computersinAfricandevelopment:Criticalperspectives. Boulder, CO:Westview.

Jansen, J. (1990). State, curriculum and socialism in Zimbabwe, 1980–1990. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Jansen, J. (1991). The state and curriculum in the transition to socialism: The Zimbabwean experience. Comparative Education Review, 35 (1), 76–91.

Jansen, J. (1993). Curriculum reform in Zimbabwe: Reflections for the South African transition. In N. Taylor (Ed. ), Inventing knowledge—contests in curriculum construction. Cape Town, South Africa: Maskew Miller Longman.

Jansen, J. (1995). Understanding social transition through the lens of curriculum policy: Namibia/South Africa. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 27 (3), 245–261.

Kafupi, P. (1999, September). Some male learners in grade 10 geography. Reform Forum, 10.

Katzao, J. (1999). Lessons to learn. A historical, sociological and economic interpretation of education provision in Namibia. Windhoek, Namibia: Out of Africa Publishers.

Kristensen, J. O. (1999). Reform and/or change? The Nambian broad curriculum revisited. Reform Forum, 10, 1–7.

Legesse, K., & Otaala, B. (1998, February 25–27). Performance at (H)IGCSE in Namibia, 1995–1997. Implications for Teaching and Learning, AReport of a Workshop held at Rossing Education Centre, Faculty of Education, University of Namibia, Namibia.

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