International Handbook of Curriculum Research

By William F. Pinar | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 34
Curriculum Study in Taiwan:
Retrospect and Prospect
Jenq-Jye Hwang
National Tainan Teachers College, Taiwan
Chia-Yu Chang
National Taipei University of Technology, Taiwan

Curriculum study is not only the foundation of curriculum development and innovation; it could also serve as a watchdog over the quality of education. However, there lies a close connection between curriculum study and the social context of a country. On the one hand, the outcomes of curriculum study may lead to a social change and can promote human qualities; on the other hand, the issues and approaches of curriculum study are also influenced by the sociopolitical situation.

The R. O. C. (Taiwan) government, established on Formosa Island in 1949, has been Westernized in its education system in which there was never a lack of discussion or experimentation with the school curriculum. Yet not until the mid-1980s did the field of curriculum study appear in teacher education programs and in the top agenda of educational research. Indeed, as mentioned, the social change played a critical role.


SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Social Background

Encompassed by an authoritarian political atmosphere, Taiwan's society has been underneath strict surveillance, regulation, and control. Education was merely considered an apparatus for implementing political policies and maintaining Taiwan as a stable state. In 1987, when Martial Law was lifted, new political parties and mass media sprang up and contributed to Taiwan society's moving forward to the new epoch of a genuine democracy. Shortly after, in 1991, the government declared the termination of the law, the Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of National Mobilization in Suppression of Communist Rebellion. After decades of suppression, societal forces began to explode. Consequently, the debates and criticisms on political, cultural, historical, and educational issues that pushed forward the development of curriculum study flourished further and thus rendered Taiwan a perfect condition favorable for the blooming of curriculum study.

-595-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Handbook of Curriculum Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 704

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.