Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman

By Alex Quaison-Sackey | Go to book overview

Foreword

by Osagyefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah President of the Republic of Ghana

THE DECADE following the early 1950's may truly be regarded as Africa's decade. Breathtaking and significant changes have taken place on the African continent that were undreamed of twelve or fifteen years to earlier. The independence of Ghana in March, 1957, proved to be the beginning of a great avalanche which was soon to sweep before it the "possessions" and "spheres of influence" of the colonial powers. A majority of these so- called possessions have been transformed in our time into sovereign, independent states, and the process of decolonization goes on unabated.

Our next goal is to attain the political unification of the African continent so as to give form and substance to our independence through total disengagement from imperialist and colonialist entanglements.

It is about these changes that are taking place in Africa that Alex Quaison-Sackey writes with such force and clarity in Africa Unbound. Coming from a distinguished diplomat who has himself been actively associated with some of the political factors affecting the complicated process of evolution, this book should serve to promote understanding of the forces at work in Africa

-vii-

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Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - The African Independence Movement 5
  • II - The African Personality 35
  • III - African Unity: the Meaning of The Accra Conference 59
  • IV - Positive Neutralism and Nonalignment 100
  • V - Africa and the United Nations 124
  • VI - Reflections of a Young Statesman 156
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