Handbook of Health Communication

By Teresa L. Thompson; Alicia M. Dorsey et al. | Go to book overview

III
Social and Community
Health Issues
Alicia M. Dorsey

As the breadth of chapters in the present volume attests, the field of health communication has expanded greatly over the past two to three decades. As the chapters in the previous sections demonstrate, although we have identified many important links between communication practices and health, there still exists a wealth of unanswered questions related to this complex relationship in traditional medical settings, such as health care facilities, or within the context of a health care provider-client interface. In addition, although consistent findings related to the role of mass media in influencing health behavior exist, there are also an infinite number of questions yet unanswered related to the role of health messages transmitted to a variety of target audiences through mass media channels or a host of new technologies, as outlined in the section following this one. These sections of the present volume certainly highlight the mainstays of the field of health communication. However, recent years have seen a broadening of contexts within which scholars investigate the inherent relationships between communication and health.

Two such contexts are highlighted in the present section of this handbook. First, over the years we have seen a heightened level of activity focused on the community context in attempts to address “local” health and public health-related issues. There has been an emerging recognition, particularly within underserved and hard-to-reach areas, that perhaps the most hopeful health interventions are those planned and executed by communities themselves. The ultimate effectiveness of this process of coming together as a community to tackle specific health concerns—separating the symptoms of a problem from the actual sources of the problem, identifying strategies for addressing these key issues, and negotiating resources to support the efforts—clearly is predicated on the emergent communication practices within and throughout the community. This unique and vital context has only recently been a focus of extensive communication investigation.

A second evolving context for health communication investigation involves a closer examination of the role of informal talk within the context of social relationships on our health and well-being. We have long recognized the power of social support. However,

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Health Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 753

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.