Handbook of Health Communication

By Teresa L. Thompson; Alicia M. Dorsey et al. | Go to book overview

18
Organizational Rhetoric and
Healthcare Policymaking
Charles Conrad
Texas A&M University
Holly Gene McIntush
Texas House of Representatives

Health policies and policymaking play a central role in almost every dimension of health communication (Miller & Ryan, 2001). Sometimes the effects are direct, as when laws mandate HIV testing of pregnant women, regulations forbid providers from discussing abortion as a treatment option, or negotiated settlements in state lawsuits against tobacco companies allow those companies to veto public health messages that are excessively graphic, condemning, or potentially effective. Sometimes the effects are indirect, as when laws allow HMOs and insurance companies to impose treatment-related gag rules on providers, Medicare regulations inadvertently encourage providers to diagnose patients in ways that maximize allowable charges for their treatment, or various policies create incentives to favor acute over preventative care (Moon, 1996).

Given its importance, it is especially disconcerting to note that the healthcare policymaking process in the United States seems to be especially irrational and nonsystematic. The titles of a series of recent studies express this feeling: Reagan's The Accidental System (1999) describes overall U. S. policy; Hacker's The Road to Nowhere (1997) and Skocpol's Boomerang (1996) trace the development and demise of the most recent federal effort toward comprehensive policymaking; and Aaron's The Problem That Won't Go Away (1996) and Kleinke's Bleeding Edge (1998) offer little hope that a more coherent system will emerge in the near future. Conversely, formal organizations, both inside and outside of the healthcare sector, historically have had major effects on healthcare policy. Most often this influence occurs out of public view, through direct lobbying of legislators and members of the executive branch (Biersack et al., 1999; Goldstein, 1999). But recently organizations have engaged in rhetoric that has the goal of directly influencing public opinion on healthcare issues and policies.

In this chapter we enter into the quagmire that is U. S. healthcare policymaking. In doing so, we have three goals in mind: (a) to summarize contemporary models of

-403-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Health Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 753

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.