Handbook of Health Communication

By Teresa L. Thompson; Alicia M. Dorsey et al. | Go to book overview

28
Lessons Learned from the
Field on Prevention and
Health Campaigns
Timothy Edgar
Emerson College
Vicki Freimuth
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Sharon Lee Hammond

The goal of this chapter is to discuss important lessons that the three authors have learned that relate to prevention and health communication campaigns. The editors asked us to coauthor the chapter because each of us has lived multiple lives within the health communication discipline. All three of us began our research careers within an academic setting, and we worked together for several years as a research team at the same educational institution. Although we each had other research interests that we pursued, for a period of time we all devoted much of our collaborative efforts to investigating the role of communication in preventing the spread of HIV. At the time, none of us could have predicted that new paths would soon provide us with an incredible variety of experiences encompassing contexts we never had explored and audiences with which we were not familiar.

Vicki Freimuth left the academic world to serve in the federal government as the first Associate Director for Communication at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In her position, she balances the roles of health communication practitioner and health communication researcher. She is a practitioner in the sense that her office guides or collaborates on the design and implementation of national health communication activities that reflect the many health issues that CDC addresses. While no longer a day-to-day

At the time that the authors first wrote this chapter, Timothy Edgar and Sharon Lee Hammond worked as research contractors for Westat in the company's Rockville, Maryland and Atlanta, Georgia offices respectively. The observations they make in the chapter are based on their experiences while employed at Westat. Since the completion of the chapter, Dr. Edgar has become an Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Health Communication at Emerson College in Boston, and Dr. Hammond now works as an independent consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

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