Seeking Equity for Women in Journalism and Mass Communication Education: A 30-Year Update

By Ramona R. Rush; Carol E. Oukrop et al. | Go to book overview

6
Peering Through the Glass
Ceiling of the Boy's Club

Examining How Masculinity
Affects Journalism and Mass
Communication Education
Billy Wooten

Two participants on a 1992 Australian television show, Couchman Over Australia, had a heated exchange concerning men's responses to feminism:

Perry Hoskins: “Men are cast in the role as oppressors. The burden of guilt is attached to being male, regardless of one's individual conduct. Men are very definitely being seen to blame for the various ills affecting womanhood. ”

Liz Connor: “The important thing to say is not that feminism is accusing individual men of being oppressors. Feminism is asking men to own up to the ways that they have been privileged by those systems and structures [which reinforce structural inequities]. (Pease, 2000, p. 100)

This exchange points to a prevalent problem in social practice: exposing sexism and the various ways it manifests itself in our systemic society. A more underlying problem is how sexism is reified by not only those persons in positions of power, but also those who are subordinated by those in power. One area that has been negatively influenced by this emphasis to create difference is the workplace. Sociologist Cohen (2001) stated, “As a social institution, gender is a process of creating distinguishable social statuses for the assignment of rights and responsibilities. As part of a stratification system that ranks these statuses un

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