Applied Public Relations: Cases in Stakeholder Management

By Larry F. Lamb; Kathy Brittain McKee | Go to book overview

7
Stakeholders: Members and Volunteers

Of all stakeholder relationships, those that nonprofit organizations have with members or volunteers may be at the same time the most tenuous and the most necessary. Stakeholders who enter into a relationship with a nonprofit group, whether it is an alumni association, a professional group, or a social service agency, usually have some need or goal that motivates their joining, donating, serving, or attending. Yet that need or goal is usually self-directed, meaning that if it is not satisfied or supported, the individual will find another source for satisfaction or motivation. Similarly, most, if not all, membership or volunteer-based organizations have needs or goals as well. In order to address their missions, most often the need is financial, with the organization heavily dependent on donations to maintain activities or services. The need may also be for staffing, where in essence the volunteers are functioning as quasi-employees of the organization. Such great pressures may tempt organizations to exploit donors, volunteers, or clients or to forego truthful disclosure when puffery or evasion may bring quicker returns.

The relationships between such organizations and their stakeholders are best maintained when they are founded on mutual trust built and maintained through meeting mutually recognized needs and interests. Organizations with a clear sense of their mission and an articulation of how the stakeholders are aligned with that mission are the most likely to succeed in building those types of relationships. However, no matter how lofty the expressed mission and purpose statement of an organization may be, the most pertinent factor in determining an ongoing relationship is found in satisfying the donor's, volunteer's, or member's multiple motivations as well as the overall objectives of the group. For example, donors may be highly sympathetic to the mission an organization has to offer support services for cancer patients in their area. An altruistic desire to help those in need may drive do-

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Applied Public Relations: Cases in Stakeholder Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Cases xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Public Relations: Maintaining Mutually Beneficial Systems of Stakeholder Relationships 1
  • 2 - Stakeholders: Employees 7
  • 3 - Stakeholders: Community 36
  • 4 - Stakeholders: Consumers 61
  • 5 - Stakeholders: Media 88
  • 6 - Stakeholders: Investors 118
  • 7 - Stakeholders: Members and Volunteers 141
  • 8 - Stakeholders: Governments and Regulators 168
  • 9 - Stakeholders: Activists 192
  • 10 - Stakeholders: Global Citizens 222
  • Index 253
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