Applied Public Relations: Cases in Stakeholder Management

By Larry F. Lamb; Kathy Brittain McKee | Go to book overview

9
Stakeholders: Activists

Activists are saints, sinners, and sometimes both. It depends on your perspective of the public issue on which activists are focusing. Because issues seldom have only two sides, several activist organizations may get involved in a public discussion or controversy and try to influence its eventual outcome. Not only would the groups voice a range of viewpoints, but they also might use a variety of methods to grab attention and get support for their preferred outcome.

Activist groups generally adopt conventional behaviors, conforming to public expectations because there's little reward in intentionally annoying people. Some groups are more colorful or aggressive, especially if they have a hard time getting noticed. A small number are deliberately destructive and engage in illegal acts.

The SUV is a case in point. SUVs have accounted for about 25% of automakers' revenues and half of their profits in recent years. However, some activists have tried to reverse the vehicle's growing popularity through public relations campaigns that focused on SUVs' potential harms to the environment, highway safety, energy independence, and insurance-rate equity.


ACTIVISTS AGAINST SUVS

Groups advocating restrictions on SUVs have included Earth on Empty, Evangelical Environmental Network, Friends of the Earth, Sierra Club, and Union of Concerned Scientists.

Earth on Empty activists ticketed parked SUVs in 500 cities with notices that resembled parking violation envelopes. On the notices were statements such as “SUVs emit up to 5.5 times as much air pollution per mile as cars. ” Friends of the Earth sold bumper stickers with messages like “Support OPEC. Buy an SUV. ” The

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Applied Public Relations: Cases in Stakeholder Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Cases xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Public Relations: Maintaining Mutually Beneficial Systems of Stakeholder Relationships 1
  • 2 - Stakeholders: Employees 7
  • 3 - Stakeholders: Community 36
  • 4 - Stakeholders: Consumers 61
  • 5 - Stakeholders: Media 88
  • 6 - Stakeholders: Investors 118
  • 7 - Stakeholders: Members and Volunteers 141
  • 8 - Stakeholders: Governments and Regulators 168
  • 9 - Stakeholders: Activists 192
  • 10 - Stakeholders: Global Citizens 222
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.