Avant Garde Theatre, 1892-1992

By Christopher Innes | Go to book overview

NOTES

1

INTRODUCTION

1
Renato Poggioli, The Theory of the Avant-Garde, Cambridge, Mass. 1968, p. 224.
2
The previous version of this study included a discussion of the avant garde line in modern dance, using Mary Wigman, Meredith Monk and Anne Halprin as representative examples (see Holy Theatre, Cambridge 1984, pp. 53-4 and 247-51) as well as consideration of some figures only tangentially related to the movement, such as Samuel Beckett or Peter Weiss.
3
See Mircea Eliade, Myths, Rites, Symbols, New York 1967, vol. 1, p. 88.
4
Peter Brook (following Grotowski), programme note to the Tempest., Centre for International Theatre Research, 1968.
5
Sigmund Freud, Standard Edition, vol. 20, p. 72. For a discussion of Freud and Lévi-Strauss in relation to primitivism—and of the way modern attitudes have been conditioned by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Conrad, D. H. Lawrence, or art exhibitions such as Roger Fry’s Post-Impressionist exhibition of 1910 and the 1984 MOMA ‘Primitivism in 20th-Century Art: Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern’ exhibition—see Marianna Torgovnick, Gone Primitive, Chicago 1990.
6
Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and his World (trans. Helene Iswolsky), Cambridge, Mass. 1968, p. 224.
7
W. B. Yeats and T. Sturge Moore: Their Correspondence, 1910-1937, New York 1953, p. 156; Yeats, Essays and Introductions, London 1961, pp. 333 and 224ff; and Yeats, note to A Vision, cit. in Richard Ellman, The Identity of Yeats, New York 1964, p. 166.

2

THE POLITICS OF PRIMITIVISM

1
Cf. Mikhail Bakhtin, Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics (trans. Caryl Emerson), Minneapolis 1984, p. 126, and Rabelais and his World (trans. Helene Iswolsky), Cambridge, Mass. 1968, p. 3.
2
Rabelais and his World, pp. 92 and 255.
3
Ibid., pp. 39 and 48.
4
Ibid., pp. 7 and 10; and Matei Calinescu, Five Faces of Modernity, Durham, NC 1987, p. 275: although Calinescu refers only to painting and poetry, the combination is equally characteristic of avant garde theatre—see the epigraph to Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Enchained, discussed on p. 27 in this volume.
5
Leopold Jessner, cit. in D. Calandra, Theatre Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2 (1976). p.52.
6
Charles Marowitz, in Mobiler Spielraum—Theater der Zukunft, ed. Karlheinz Braun, Frankfurt 1970, p. 127. Ionesco made exactly the same point in his

-234-

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Avant Garde Theatre, 1892-1992
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Politics of Primitivism 6
  • 3 - Dreams, Archetypes and the Irrational 19
  • 4 - Therapy and Subliminal Theatre 36
  • 5 - Antonin Artaud and the Theatre of Cruelty 59
  • 6 - Ritual and Acts of Communion 95
  • 7 - Black Masses and Ceremonies of Negation 108
  • 8 - Myth and Theatre Laboratories 125
  • 9 - Secular Religions and Physical Spirituality 149
  • 10 - Anthropology, Environmental Theatre and Sexual Revolution 167
  • 11 - Interculturalism and Expropriating the Classics 193
  • 12 - From the Margins to Mainstream 214
  • Notes 234
  • Select Bibliography 250
  • Index 255
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