Elbert H. Gary: TESTIMONY BEFORE THE SENATE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE

THE Committee on Education and Labor of the United States Senate met, pursuant to the call of the chairman, in room 235, Senate Office Building, Hon. William S. Kenyon presiding. . . .

THE CHAIRMAN. We would like to hear from you as to the genesis of this strike, the questions involved as you see them, and everything about it.

MR. GARY. I suppose you know my business connections?

THE CHAIRMAN. Yes; but probably it would be well for you to make that clear in the record.

MR. GARY. I am the chairman of the board of directors, chairman of the finance committee, and chief executive officer of the United States Steel Corporation in general charge of its affairs. . . .

It has been well known for several years, more especially during the last two years, that the labor unions were attempting, in their own way, to organize the employees of the subsidiary companies of the United States Steel Corporation. That has been frequently and publicly announced.

It has been stated on this floor, before this honorable committee, that the subsidiary companies of the United States Steel Corporation have been guilty of ill treatment of their employees, and some statements made before the committee have been based on misinformation and are absolutely without foundation.

I wish to state, Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, that there is no basic industry in this country, nor in the world, in my opinion, which has paid larger wages to its employees than the United States Steel Corporation, and perhaps not as large; nor treated its employees with greater respect and consideration than the United States Steel Corporation and its subsidiaries, if as great. . . .

It has been charged that during the impending strike the subsidiary companies have been guilty of attacking and mistreating the strikers. That is entirely without foundation. There is not a vestige of truth in that statement.

Three instances have been mentioned by a former witness. A photograph was displayed, I think before this committee, and it was said a woman was killed by representatives of a subsidiary company. . . .

Mrs. Fannie Snellings was shot at a place called Brackenridge, in Pennsylvania. We have no works there; no men there.

If she was killed at that place, concerning which I have no contradiction to make, it was by people other than anyone connected with any subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation or with the corporation itself, or with the knowledge of any of them. . . .

SENATOR JONES. What was the cause of that disturbance?

MR. GARY. Strikers were, as I understand, attacking coal miners and some of

____________________

From Hearings before the Committee on Education and Labor, U. S. Senate, Sixty-sixth Congress, Pursuant to S. Res. 202 ( Washington, Government Printing Office, 1919), pp. 145-148, 150-154, 161, 163-164, 166-168, 173-175, 206-208, 215-219.

-33-

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