TESTIMONY OF RESIDENTS OF MILL TOWNS

MR. J. S. OURSLER, GENERAL MANAGER OF THE HOMESTEAD STEEL WORKS

THE CHAIRMAN. Your name is J. S. Oursler, and you are general manager of the Homestead Steel Works?

MR. OURSLER. Yes, sir!

THE CHAIRMAN. And what is the total number of employees here?

MR. OURSLER. The total number of employees is 11,500.

THE CHAIRMAN. And how many out of that total are now at work?

MR. OURSLER. Nine thousand and forty-four.

* * *

THE CHAIRMAN. What percentage of the number employed are foreigners?

MR. OURSLER. We have 40 per cent Americans, 9 per cent colored.

THE CHAIRMAN. And do you call the colored men Americans?

MR. OURSLER. Yes.

SENATOR MCKELLAR. And of the 25 per cent of your employees who are on strike, what percentage of them are foreigners, would you say? . . .

MR. OURSLER. Ninety-nine and ninetenths per cent are foreigners who are out on strike.

* * *

THE CHAIRMAN. Have you had any violence from these people who are out on strike, Mr. Oursler? Has there been any violence at all?

MR. OURSLER. I should say yes; we had a number of individual cases where a man was beaten up and of throwing bricks through a window, but we have not had any serious amount of violence.

* * *

SENATOR PHIPPS. Is there any definite organized effort at the present time to keep the men away from the plant?

MR. OURSLER. No; not a great deal of it; just here and there is all. They did have the plants pretty well picketed, but that is practically over with and there is very little picketing to-day.

SENATOR MCKELLAR. Do you allow them to hold their meetings?

MR. OURSLER. Yes, sir.

SENATOR MCKELLAR. Is there any curbing of their speech at all at those meetings?

MR. OURSLER. They have to speak in English; that is all.

* * *

SENATOR MCKELLAR. Is there any complaint on account of the wages on the part of those who are out? MR. OURSLER. No.

* * *

THE CHAIRMAN. You say that you have a good many Russians, have you?

MR. OURSLER. Yes, sir; we have 628 Russians.

THE CHAIRMAN. And do you notice

____________________

From Investigation of Strike in Steel Industries, Hearings before the Committee on Education and Labor, United States Senate, Sixty-sixth Congress, First Session, Pursuant to S. Res. 188 and S. Res. 202, Part 2 ( Washington, Government Printing Office, 1919), pp. 477-479, 481-482.

-58-

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