The Emergence of the Modern Indonesian Elite

By Robert Van Niel | Go to book overview

was from a traditional, cosmologically oriented, hereditary elite to a modern, welfare-state oriented, education-based elite. This modern elite is far more heterogeneous than the traditional, but little effort has been made to produce a structural analysis of the modern elite here. Mention is made of administrators, civil servants, technicians, professional men and intellectuals, but in final instance the main distinction made here is between a functional and a political elite. With functional elite is meant those leaders who served, past and present, to keep a modernized state and society functioning, while with political elite is meant those Indonesians who engaged in political activities directed toward ends but usually involving some alteration of the political status quo. The former group served a greater social function through acting as the medium of change than is often realized, while the latter were of more symbolic than practical significance during the period covered by this book.

The expression 'Indonesian elite' may be somewhat misleading. Technically speaking there was no unit known as Indonesia in either a political or a social sense during the years encompassed by this study. Nor were all parts of the East Indian or Indonesian archipelago of equal importance in the developments with which this study deals. As a matter of fact, the island of Java, with its neighbour Madura, henceforth collectively referred to as just ' Java', was the unquestioned focal point of East Indian activity. Not only was Java the political, administrative, and economic center for Netherlands India, but it was also the population center of the archipelago with about 70% of the total number of inhabitants. Most of the people on Java belonged to the Javanese ethnic group who reside mostly in central and eastern Java. In 1900 there were about seventeen million Javanese. But there are other large ethnic groups on Java too: the Sundanese of West Java numbered around seven million at the beginning of the century, and the Madurese of Madura and East Java numbered about three million. In addition to these case major components of the population of Java, there were scatterings of other Indonesian peoples from other islands of the archipelago. The upshot of all

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Emergence of the Modern Indonesian Elite
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - East Indian Society in 1900 4
  • Chapter II - The Acceleration of Change, 1900-1914 31
  • Chapter III - Rampant Radicalism and Steady Growth, 1914-1920 101
  • Chapter IV - Syncretism and Conservatism, 1920- Ca. 1927 196
  • Notes 253
  • Index 303
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.