Catholic Political Thought, 1789-1848

By Baéla Menczer | Go to book overview

III. FRANÇOIS RENÉ, DE CHATEAUBRIAND
1768-1848

CHATEAUBRIAND'S place in a chronological survey of Catholic thought since the French Revolution comes immediately after Joseph de Maistre and Vicomte de Bonald. The Considérations sur la France of the first writer, the Théorie du Pouvoir of the second and Chateaubriand Essai sur les Révolutions were the three great commentaries published on the events of 1789-93. All three were written abroad and were influenced by, and to a great extent inspired by an English book, Burke Reflections on the French Revolution.

Bonald's book was the final expression and the systematic summary of the thought of an author in his forties; everything else he wrote in his life was but an addition or glossary to it. Joseph de Maistre, about the same age as Bonald, wrote his principal bookthe Soirées de Saint Pétersbourg--a quarter of a century later; his Considérations sur la France and even Du Pape were but prefaces to his final thought. In Chateaubriand's case, however, his comment on the Revolution was not so much as a preface even to the ultimate summary of his thought and it merely marked one step towards the final pinnacle of his style. The subject, however, was of immense importance in his life. Like Joseph de Maistre and Bonald, Chateaubriand, half a generation younger than they, became a writer because of the French Revolution; a principal feature in his work is the new historical and political approach to theology, which resulted from the context of the Revolution. Yet, he is, above all, one of the masters, perhaps the foremost one, of a new concept of literature. He is a master among the new post-Revolutionary secular religious writers. He is the first of those modern poets who are not craftsmen of rhyme and stage technique--there were many such during the eighteenth century--and he it was who gave to the word "poet" that larger, more universal meaning which it still keeps in German. According to this new concept, the poet is a writer, often a prose-writer ( Chateaubriand himself wrote almost entirely in prose, for his attempts at verse and at poetic tragedy were a failure), who must be judged above all by standards of personal feeling and temperament. In other words, Chateaubriand was the father of Romanticism. In aesthetics he saved that part of Rousseau's message which was valid truth, and the rest of which was otherwise so disastrous in politics.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Catholic Political Thought, 1789-1848
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 5- the Primacy of Politics: From Montesquieu to Bonald 38
  • I- Joseph De Maistre 1753-1821 59
  • III- François René, De Chateaubriand 1768-1848 96
  • IV- Honoré De Balzac 1799-1850 108
  • V- Friedrich Von Schlegel 1772-1829 119
  • VIII- Jaime Balmes 1810-1848 183
  • IX- Louis Veuillot 1813-1878 192
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 205

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.