Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education

By Elliot W. Eisner; Michael D. Day | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Adi-Japhe, E., Levin, I., & Solomon, S. (1998). Emergence of representation in drawing: The relation between kinematics and referential aspects. Cognitive Development, 13(1), 25–51.

Amabile, T. (1989). Growing up creative. New York: Crown.

Anderson, T. (1990). Attaining critical appreciation through art. Studies in Art Education, 31(3), 132–140.

Anderson, T., & Milbrandt, M. (1998). Authentic instruction in art: Why and how to dump the school art style. Visual Arts Research, 24(1), 13–20.

Arnheim, R. (1998). Why words are needed. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 32(2), 21–25.

Arnstein, D. (1990). Art, aesthetics, and the pitfalls of discipline-based art education. Educational Theory, 40(4), 415–422.

Atkinson, D. (1999). A critical reading of the national curriculum for art in light of contemporary theories of subjectivity. Journal of Art and Design Education, 18(1), 107–113.

Barrett, T. (1988). A comparison of the goals of studio professors conducting critiques and art education goals for teaching criticism. Studies in Art Education, 30(1), 22–27.

Barrett, T. (1994). Principles for interpreting art. Art Education, 47(5), 8–13.

Barrett, T. (1997). Talking about Student Art. Art Education Practice Series. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications.

Barrett, T. (2000). Studio critiques of student art: As they are, as they could be with mentoring. Theory Into Practice, 39(1), 29–35.

Baum, S., Owen, S., & Oreck, B. (1997). Transferring individual self-regulation processes from arts to academics. Art Education Policy Review, 98(4), 32–39.

Becker, H. (1982). Art worlds. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Berk, L. (1992). Children's private speech: An overview of theory and the status of research. In R. Diaz & L. Berk (Eds. ), (pp. 17–53). Private speech: From social interaction to self-regulation. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, Associates.

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Blaikie, F. (1994). Values inherent in qualitative assessment of secondary studio art in North America: Advanced placement, Arts PROPEL, and International Baccalaureate. Studies in Arts Education, 35(4), 237–48.

Blythe, T., Allen, D., & Schieffelin Powell, B. (1999). Looking together at student work. New York: Teachers College Record.

Bourdieu, P. (1984). Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

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Bourdieu, P. (1993). The field of cultural production. New York: Columbia University Press.

Boyatzis, C. (2000). The artistic evolution of mommy: A longitudinal case study of symbolic and social processes. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 90, 5–29.

Bulka, J. (1996). You call that art? A critique of the critique. The New Art Examiner, 23(6), 22–25.

Burton, J., Horowitz, R., & Abeles, H. (1999). Learning in & through the arts: Curriculum implications. In E. Fiske (Ed. ), Champions of change: The arts & learning (pp. 35–46). Washington, DC: Arts Education Partnership.

Cahan, S., & Kocur, Z. (1996). Contemporary art and multicultural education. New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Campbell, S. (2001). Shouts in the dark: Community arts organizations for students in rural schools with “urban” problems. Education and Urban Society, 33(4), 445–456.

Carolan, R. (2001). Models and paradigms of art therapy research. Art Therapy, 18(4), 190–220.

Catterall, J. (1998). Involvement in the Arts and Success in Secondary School. Washington DC. Americans for the Arts, Monograph, 1(9).

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Cunningham, A. (1997). Criteria and processes used by seven-year-old children in appraising art work of their peers. Visual Arts Research, 23(1), 41–48.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: Harper Collins.

Csikszentmihalyi, M., Rathunde, K., Whalen, S., & Wong, M. (2000). Talented teenagers: The roots of success and failure. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Darby, J., & Catterall, J. (1994). The fourth R: The arts and learning. Teachers College Record, 96(2), 299–328.

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