Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education

By Elliot W. Eisner; Michael D. Day | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Adams, L. S. (1996). The methodologies of art: An introduction. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

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Arnheim, R. (1986). New essays on the psychology of art. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press.

Arnheim, R. (1969). Visual thinking. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press.

Arnstine, D. (1965). Needed research and the role of definitions in art. Studies in Art Education, 7(1), 2–17.

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Ball, M. S., & Smith, G. W. H. (1992). Analyzing visual data. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Banks, M. (2001). Visual methods in social research. London: Sage.

Barrett, T. (2000). Criticizing art: Understanding the contemporary (2nd ed. ). Mountain View CA: Mayfield.

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Beittel, K. R. (1979). Unity of truth, language, and method in art education. Studies in Art Education, 21(1), 50–56.

Berger, J. (1980). About looking. New York: Pantheon Books.

Bresler, L. (1994). Zooming in on the qualitative paradigm in art education: Educational criticism, ethnography, and action research. Visual Arts Research, 20(1), 1–19.

Brockman, J. (1996). The third culture: Beyond the scientific revolution. Touchstone: Simon & Schuster.

Brown, T., & Jones L. (2001). Action research and postmodernism. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Brown, M., & Korzenik, D. (1993). Art making and education. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.

Brown, N. (2003). Art as a practice of research. Proceedings of the 31st InSEA World Congress: InSEA Member Presentations Papers and Workshops CD-ROM. New York: The Center for International Art Education, Inc., Teachers College Columbia University.

Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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Carey, S., & Gelman, R. (Eds. ). (1991). The epigenesis of mind: Essays in biology and cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Carrier, D. (2003). Writing about visual art. New York: Allworth Press.

Chalmers, F. G. (1981). Art education as ethnology. Studies in Art Education, 22(3), 6–14.

Chadwick, W. (1990). Women, art, and society. London: Thames and Hudson.

Changeux, J. (1994). Art and neuroscience. Leonardo, 27(3), 189–201.

Cizek, G. (1995). Crunchy granola and the hegemony of the narrative. Educational Researcher, 24(2), 26–28.

Creswell, J. W. (2002). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (2nd Ed. ). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Csikzentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper & Row.

Danto, A. C. (1986). The philosophical disenfranchisement of art. New York: Columbia University Press.

Danto, A. C. (2001, May 28). In the bosom of Jesus. The Nation, 30–34.

Duncum, P., & Bracy, T. (Eds. ). (2001). On knowing: Art and visual culture. Christchurch, NZ; Canterbury University Press.

Ecker, D. W. (1965). Editorial: On the possibility of theory in art. Studies in Art Education, 6(2), 1–6.

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Efland, A. D. (1990). A history of art education. Intellectual and social currents in teaching the visual arts. New York: Teachers College Press.

Efland, A. D. (1995). The spiral and the lattice: Changes in cognitive learning theory with implications for art education. Studies in Art Education, 36(3), 134–153.

Efland, A. D. (2002). Art and cognition: Integrating the visual arts in the curriculum. New York: Teachers College Press and Reston, VA: National Art Education Association.

Eisner, E. W. (1964). Toward a new era in art education. Studies in Art Education, 6(2), 54–62.

Eisner, E. W. (1985). The art of educational evaluation: A personal view. London: The Falmer Press.

Eisner, E. W. (1991). The enlightened eye: Qualitative inquiry and the enhancement of educational practice. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Eisner, E. W. (1993). Forms of understanding and the future of educational research. Educational Researcher, 22(7), 5–11.

Eisner, E. W. (1999). Rejoinder: A response to Tom Knapp. Educational Researcher, 28(1), 19–20.

Ellis, C., & Flaherty, M. G. (Eds. ). (1992). Investigating subjectivity: Research on lived experience. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

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