A Comparative Study of the Indian Constitution - Vol. 1

By Sirdar D. K. Sen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
FINANCIAL POWERS UNDER THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION

The Problems of Federal Finance . It has already been indicated that an essential feature of federations is the distribution of sovereign powers between the central authorities and the constituent units. It follows, therefore, as a logical corollary that the financial powers of every federal State must similarly be partitioned between the central organization and the component States. Every federal State is, therefore, led to seek and establish an equilibrium in the financial relations of its diverse organs. Contribution to the expenditure of the federation and participation in its resources: in other words, division of the financial sovereignty of a federal State constitutes an intricate and complex problem. It has been asserted that financial sovereignty is not sovereignty as it appears from the constitution but as it exhibits itself in the working.1 This is only partially true, for the division of financial sovereignty must in all essentials correspond to the distribution of legislative and executive powers as embodied in the constitution. Indeed, several eminent authors have held that the equilibrium of financial relations or finanzausgleich, as it is called by German jurists, must depend on the solution of the problem of division of sovereign powers. Thus, according to Jessen, "the object of the regulation established by finanzausgleich is to guarantee the satisfaction of the financial needs of the constitutional entities established in the State, but the financial needs are delimited by the extent of the fields of their activity." He, therefore, asserts that the establishment of finanzausgleith must "be conditioned by the obligations which are incumbent, in point of law or fact, on the constitutional entities."

Two factors of capital importance dominate the entire question of federal finance. In the first place, as Delpech rightly points out, the

____________________
1
1 Finer, Theory and Practice of Modern Government, Vol. I., p. 316.

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Comparative Study of the Indian Constitution - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 384

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.