Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings

By Charles N. Cofer; Barbara S. Musgrave | Go to book overview
Ryan J. J., III. ( 1960) "Comparison of verbal response transfer mediated by meaningfully similar and associated stimuli". J. Exp. Psychol., 60, 408-415.
Schulz R. W., & McGehee Nan E. ( 1960) Mediation in verbal paired associate learning. Paper read at Midwest. Psychol. Ass., Chicago.
Segal Sydney J., & Cofer C. N. ( 1960) "The effect of recency and recall on word association". Amer. Psychologist, 15, 451. (Abstract)
Shipley W. C. ( 1933) "An apparent transfer of conditioning". J. Gen. Psychol., 8, 382-391.
Shipley W. C. ( 1935) "Indirect conditioning". J. Gen. Psychol., 12, 337-357.
Staats A. W., & Staats Carolyn K. ( 1959) "Meaning and m: Separate but correlated". Psychol. Rev., 66, 136-144.
Storms L. H. ( 1956) Backward association in verbally mediated learning. Ph.D. thesis, University of Minnesota.
Storms L. H. ( 1958) "Apparent backward association: A situational effect". J. Exp. Psychol., 55, 390-395.
Whitmarsh G. H., & Bousfield W. A. ( 1961) "Use of free associational norms for the prediction of generalization of salivary conditioning to verbal stimuli". Psychol. Rep., 8, 91-95.
Wickens D. D., & Briggs G. E. ( 1951) "Mediated stimulus generalization as a factor in sensory pre-conditioning". J. Exp. Psychol., 42, 197-200.
Wynne R. D., & Cofer C. N. ( 1958) On meaning, association and transfer. (Unpublished manuscript, privately circulated.)

COMMENTS ON PROFESSOR JENKINS'S PAPER

George Mandler

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Over the past few years, the weight of evidence for the mediation hypothesis has made the phenomenon more than a curiosity; it approaches the status of established fact. It is this weight and persistence that makes it possible for Professor Jenkins to do something few psychologists should or would dare to offer, and even fewer would hope to have accepted. He is able to present a line of argument and theoretical discussion based to a large extent on a massive negative finding--the failure of the four-stage mediation paradigm. This can be done only when the weight of past evidence and past experience is such that we know that these negative findings must lead to a reexamination of the general hypothesis, not to any puny carping about design or procedure. Professor Jenkins knew there was something wrong because he had known how to do it right for so many years.

In the first part of my discussion I want to comment on some of the problems raised by Professor Jenkins within the framework of the mediation models--particularly one based on word-association norms. In the second part I want to depart from the mediation mold, take a second

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction and Summary 1
  • Chapter 2 - An Analysis of The Recognition Process 10
  • Comments on Professor Murdock's Paper 21
  • Chapter 3 - Stimulus Selection In Verbal Learning 33
  • References 48
  • References 48
  • References 67
  • Chapter 4 - Meaningfulness and Familiarity 76
  • Comments on Professor Noble's Paper 115
  • References 151
  • Chapter 5 - The Acquisition of Syntax 158
  • References 194
  • References 197
  • References 201
  • Chapter 6 - Mediated Associations: Paradigms and Situations 210
  • References 240
  • Comments on Professor Jenkins's Paper 242
  • References 245
  • References 252
  • Chapter 7 - Purpose and the Problem Of Associative Selectivity 258
  • References 289
  • Chapter 8 - One-Trial Learning 295
  • References 319
  • Comments on Professor Postman's Paper 320
  • References 328
  • Brief Notes on the Epam Theory Of Verbal Learning 332
  • References 333
  • Chapter 9 - Immediate Memory: Data and Theory 336
  • Comments on Professor Peterson's Paper 351
  • References 353
  • Chapter 10 - Summary and Evaluation 374
  • Index 383
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.