Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective

By Shimon Malin | Go to book overview

∼ EPILOGUE

There is a special mood one sometimes gets into when a long and meaningful project is drawing to a close. Sitting at my desk, at my home in rural Vermont, facing the computer screen where the word "epilogue" appeared in bold letters, I felt a mixture of satisfaction, sadness, some regret, the source of which eluded me, and some laziness. Through the window a lush, sunny scene beckoned: trees, flowers, clouds, a light blue sky. The moment was alive, just as it was; meaning was not an issue. Yet, as soon as I brought my attention back to thinking, and to issues relating to the conclusion of this book, I re-situated myself in this time, in this civilization, in this culture, and the well-known existential questions came right back.

As long as I share the world-view of this postmodern era, I see no guidance for the mind, no signpost, no beacons. Nature is impersonal, devoid of life, meaning, and value. In the domain of human intercourse, division and confusion reign supreme. In response to this challenge, a thousand prophets proclaimed a thousand little truths; I gulped them all down and stayed hungry. Does the material of this book provide me with a way out?

I felt unsure, and the more I explored these existential issues with my mind, the more unsure I became. And yet, as my attention wandered away from thought, as I watched a small branch moving gracefully in the breeze, meaning returned, ineffable to be sure, but meaning nonetheless.

Turning my attention from the view out the window to the papers on my desk, I started rummaging through a pile of old quotes I copied years ago and came across a crumpled piece of paper, on which I could discern the words "Looking beyond all objects, both inner and outer, and into their source ..." Just then I heard a car moving into the driveway and recognized the vivacious voices of Julie and Peter. I stuck the piece of paper into my pocket and went out to greet them. We settled down in the shade under a tree and took in the view.

After a while, Peter said: "I'm glad you wrote this book. It deals with an important and difficult issue: the fact that our world-view is made up of contradictory bits and pieces. As I read your book, I didn't feel that it resolved this difficulty, but it did provide a direction. It's like ... how shall I put it? My hunger hasn't been satisfied, but I know where the food is; I know where to look for it."

"I want to hear more about this direction you speak about," Julie responded. "You were talking about the direction of a solution, the direction of a world-view

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Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Nature Loves to Hide *
  • Nature Loves to Hice - Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - The Quandary *
  • I - Mach's Shadow *
  • 2 - Einstein's Dilemma *
  • 3 - The Call of Complementarity *
  • 4 - Waves of Nothingness *
  • 5 - Paul Dirac and the Spin of the Electron *
  • 6 - An Irresistible Force Meets an Immovable Rock *
  • 7 - "Nature Loves to Hide" *
  • Part Two - From a Universe of Objects to a Universe of Experiences *
  • 8 - The Elusive Obvious *
  • 9 - Objectivation *
  • 10 - In and Out of Space and Time *
  • II - "Nature Makes a Choice" *
  • 12 - Nature Alive *
  • 13 - Flashes of Existence *
  • 14 - The Expression of Knowledge *
  • 15 - A Universe of Experience *
  • 16 - The Potential and the Actual *
  • Part Three - Physics and the One *
  • 17 - Levels of Being *
  • 18 - Our Place in the Universe *
  • 19 - Physics and the One *
  • ∼ Epilogue *
  • Appendices *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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