Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective

By Shimon Malin | Go to book overview

NOTES

Chapter I

Epigraph: A. Einstein, "Autobiographical Notes," in P. A. Schilpp, ed., Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist, p. 21.

I.
W. Heisenberg, Physics and Beyond, p. 62.
2.
Ibid., p. 61.
3.
Ibid., p. 60.
4.
Ibid., p. 63.
5.
Ibid.
6.
Ibid., p. 64.

Chapter 2

Epigraph: T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets: Burnt Norton, p. 13.

I.
A. Pais, "Subtle Is the Lord," p. 5.
2.
Lucretius, On the Nature of the Universe, p. 39
3.
I. Newton, quoted in G. Holton, Introduction to Concepts and Theories in Physical Science, p. 298.
4.
St. Augustine, Confessions XI.14, p. 264; XI.28, p. 277; XI.27, p. 276.
5.
A. N. Whitehead, Science and the Modern World, p. 118.
6.
St. Augustine, Confessions XI.12, p. 262.
7.
Ibid., XI.14, p. 263.
8.
Ibid., XI.13, p. 263.
9.
A. Calaprice, collector and ed., Quotable Einstein, p. 61.
10.
There seems to be some indirect evidence that toward the end of his life Einstein softened his opposition to indeterminism. A letter that W. Pauli wrote to M. Born in 1954 contains the following passage (quoted in M. Jammer, Einstein and Religion, p. 53): "Einstein does not consider the concept of 'determinism' to be as fundamental as it is frequently held to be (as he told me emphatically many times).... [He] disputes that he uses as a criterion for the admissibility of a theory the question: 'Is it rigorously deterministic?'" To the best of my knowledge, however, there is no hint of the possible acceptance of indeterminism in Einstein's writings or public addresses. Furthermore, A. Fine analyzed this statement of Pauli's in detail and reached the conclusion that Pauli must have misinterpreted Einstein's position (Shaky Game, pp. 101-103).

Chapter 3

Epigraph: Quoted in K. Freeman, Ancilla to the Pre-Socratic Philosophers, p. 25.

I.
H. Folse, Philosophy of Niels Bohr, p. 107.
2.
A. Einstein in P. A. Schilpp, ed., Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist, p. 674.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nature Loves to Hide: Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Nature Loves to Hide *
  • Nature Loves to Hice - Quantum Physics and Reality, a Western Perspective *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - The Quandary *
  • I - Mach's Shadow *
  • 2 - Einstein's Dilemma *
  • 3 - The Call of Complementarity *
  • 4 - Waves of Nothingness *
  • 5 - Paul Dirac and the Spin of the Electron *
  • 6 - An Irresistible Force Meets an Immovable Rock *
  • 7 - "Nature Loves to Hide" *
  • Part Two - From a Universe of Objects to a Universe of Experiences *
  • 8 - The Elusive Obvious *
  • 9 - Objectivation *
  • 10 - In and Out of Space and Time *
  • II - "Nature Makes a Choice" *
  • 12 - Nature Alive *
  • 13 - Flashes of Existence *
  • 14 - The Expression of Knowledge *
  • 15 - A Universe of Experience *
  • 16 - The Potential and the Actual *
  • Part Three - Physics and the One *
  • 17 - Levels of Being *
  • 18 - Our Place in the Universe *
  • 19 - Physics and the One *
  • ∼ Epilogue *
  • Appendices *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.