The Grand Camouflage: The Communist Conspiracy in the Spanish Civil War

By Burnett Bolloten | Go to book overview

17
A Democratic and Parliamentary Republic of a New Type

I T should be stressed that at the root of the Communist Party's opposition to the CNT's plans for the socialization of industry lay the fact not merely that socialization was a threat to its own programme of nationalization, but that, in order to be effective, it had of necessity to impinge on the property of the middle classes, on whose support the Kremlin was relying for the success of its foreign policy. To counter this danger, the Spanish Communists argued that the attempts to further the revolution at the expense of the middle classes were due to a lack of political understanding on the part of the workers. "In the first days of the rebellion," declared a Communist leader, referring to Valencia, "many workers fell into a mania of confiscating and socializing, because they believed that we were in the midst of a social revolution. Nearly all industries were socialized.... This fever of 'socialization' not only laid hold of factories and workshops abandoned by bosses who supported the rebellion but even encroached on the small property of liberal and Republican employers....

"Why have the workers fallen into these errors? Mainly owing to a lack of understanding of the present political situation, which leads them to believe that we are in the midst of a social revolution."1

And Federico Melchor, a member of the Executive Committee of the JSU, the Communist-oriented Unified Socialist Youth Federation, affirmed:

"We are not making a social revolution today; we are developing a democratic revolution, and in a democratic revolution, the economy ...cannot be launched into socialist channels. If we are developing

____________________
1
Speech reported in Frente Rojo, March 30, 1937.

-180-

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