The Newly Industrializing Countries in the World Economy: Challenges for U.S. Policy

By Dina J. Sperling; Debbie A. Hall et al. | Go to book overview

chapter five

Structural Change and Trade in
Brazil and the Newly
Industrializing Latin
American Economies

Claudio R. Frischtak

The purpose of this chapter is to conduct an exploratory discussion concerning the shifts in the competitive structure of major Latin American economies over the last two decades. We are particularly interested in the changing competitive position of Brazil, which has been unable in the 1980s to sustain its impressive record of growth and diversification of manufactured exports into areas of increased skill-intensity and technological sophistication. Nonetheless, Brazil, together with Mexico, continues to be the major continental player in the international market. Its movement toward emerging areas of comparative advantage now depends on its ability to adopt a longer‐ term strategy of adjustment and modernization.

Section two situates the first- and second-tier Latin American newly industrializing countries (NICs)—respectively, Brazil and Mexico, and Argentina, Chile, and Colombia—in the world economy. Through an analysis of shifts in revealed comparative advantage (RCA), this chapter attempts to pinpoint the major changes that have occurred in the production structure of these countries and in the competitive standing of key sectors.

Although indicators of revealed comparative advantage are suggestive of individual country patterns of international specialization, they fail to establish the significance of these countries' exports in world markets. Section three thus describes the relative position both of these major Latin American countries in the world and of U. S. export markets during the 1965-1985 period. The section also suggests that, in addition to Mexico, only Brazil has had any significant penetration into the U. S. market, in terms of number of sectors and market growth rates, that might continue to generate a perceptible demand for protectionism into the next decade.

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Newly Industrializing Countries in the World Economy: Challenges for U.S. Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.