Concepts in Composition: Theory and Practice in the Teaching of Writing

By Irene L. Clark; Betty Bamberg et al. | Go to book overview

Concepts in Composition
Theory and Practice
in the Teaching of Writing

Irene L. Clark, Ph. D.
California State University, Northridge with Contributors
Betty Bamberg Dar&e Bowden John R. Edlund Lisa Gerrard Sharon Klein Julie Neff Lippman James D. Williams

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Concepts in Composition: Theory and Practice in the Teaching of Writing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Brief Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xvii
  • 1 - Process 1
  • References *
  • Readings - The New Abolitionism: Toward a Historical Background 30
  • References *
  • Composing Behaviors of One- and Multi-Draft Writers 52
  • Works Cited 69
  • 2 - Invention 71
  • References *
  • Readings - Rigid Rules, Inflexible Plans, and the Stifling of Language: a Cognitivist Analysis of Writer's Block 94
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Revision 107
  • References *
  • Readings - Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult Writers 130
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Audience 141
  • References *
  • Readings - Closing My Eyes as I Speak: an Argument for Ignoring Audience 161
  • Works Cited *
  • Audience Addressed/audience Invoked - The Role of Audience in Composition Theory and Pedagogy 182
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Assessing Writing 199
  • References *
  • Readings - Politics and the English Language 221
  • Responding to Student Writing 232
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Genre 241
  • References 261
  • Bibliography *
  • Readings - Generalizing About Genre: New Conceptions of an Old Concept 270
  • Notes *
  • Works Cited *
  • 7 - Voice 285
  • References 303
  • Readings - How to Get Power Through Voice 304
  • 8 - Grammar and Usage 313
  • References *
  • Readings - Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar 338
  • Notes *
  • 9 - Non-Native Speakers of English 363
  • References *
  • Readings - Some Thoughts from the Disciplinary Margins 388
  • Notes *
  • References 410
  • 10 - Language and Diversity 413
  • References *
  • Readings - Our Students Write with Accents—oral Paradigms for Bsd Students 452
  • Works Cited *
  • Racial Ventriloquism 466
  • Dealing with Bad Ideas: Twice is Less 469
  • Works Cited *
  • 11 - Electronic Writing Spaces 481
  • References *
  • Readings - Beyond Imagination: the Internet and Global Digital Literacy 509
  • Like Magic, Only Real 521
  • Endnote *
  • Appendix 1 - Developing Effective Writing Assignments 535
  • Appendix 2 - Developing a Syllabus 543
  • Author Index 561
  • Subject Index 565
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