Parental Control of Television Broadcasting

By Monroe E. Price; Stefaan G. Verhulst | Go to book overview

Preface and
Acknowledgments

BACKGROUND

The protection of minors from harmful content is a matter of strong public interest. Children, and not only the very young, are more vulnerable to influence than adults and, in the modem world, do not always have the guidance of their parents. Traditionally, to deal with this and related questions, societies relied on a practice of public responsibility by licensed broadcasters, or, in some contexts, a public service monopoly, especially in television. Broadcasting regulation supported parental supervision through the establishment of guidelines governing the portrayal of harmful content, the development of a specific programme schedule or watershed policy, and the classification and consequent announcement (acoustic or visual) of programmes.

At the European level, these principles are enshrined in Article 22 of the Television Without Frontiers Directive, as amended in 1997. These approaches, originally established for terrestrially based mass audience channels, became much more difficult to maintain as the sources of television programming multiplied and new technologies made the prospect of regulation far more unmanageable. New mechanisms and paradigms appropriate for a multichannel and digital environment need to be considered.

Worldwide, in the late 1990s, there was a search for alternatives, often for technical devices that would empower parents to make decisions more easily about television within their households. A shift from the state to the home of the instruments of control and responsibility was considered possible. In Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, the device known as the V-chip was adopted as a technique of choice. The question was whether European law should adopt a similar approach. To determine policy in the European Union, in 1997, the European Parliament enacted Article 22b.2 of the amended Television Without Frontiers Directive to carry out an investigation of the possible advantages and drawbacks of further and new measures for facilitating parental or guardian control over the programmes that minors might watch. According to the Directive, this survey was to consider, inter alia, the desirability of requiring new televisions to be equipped with a technical device enabling parents or guardians to fil

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Parental Control of Television Broadcasting
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.