Political Psychology

By Kristen Renwick Monroe | Go to book overview

7
Lost in Plain Sight: The Cultural
Foundations of Political Psychology
STANLEY A. RENSHON
The City University of New York

In the beginning there was no field, only disparate disciplinary interests. Lasswell's (1930) pioneering work established the field's twin centers of gravity, with one theoretical and substantive pillar firmly anchored in psychology and the other firmly anchored in politics. Since then, political psychology's success has become self-evident.1

However, successfully establishing an interdisciplinary field does not guarantee either its legitimacy or its consolidation and development. Consider the fate of psychohistory, whose early successes (Erikson, Mazlish, Low

____________________
1
Political psychology is a growth stock. There are now at least eight doctoral programs in which it is a primary specialization and many others in which it is a well-established and substantial concentration (Sears & Funk, 1991). It is, as well, an established and growing presence at the undergraduate level (Funk & Sears, 1991). Institutionally, the field has its own journal, now two decades old, an international summer institute modeled on the University of Michigan's summer consortium research methods, its own international professional society, and a new fast growing section in the American Political Science Association. Moreover, a great many disciplinary conferences in the fields of psychology and political science routinely include political psychology presentations.

The field's public visibility and importance have also reached unprecedented levels. Political psychologists are routinely asked to explain and help clarify public debates on issues ranging from abortion to war. Political psychologists have testified before Congress on the psychology of the Gulf War, and have been tapped as commentators for such important events as the Oklahoma bombing. Indeed, in such areas as presidential campaigns, and politics more generally, it is now fairly routine to have political psychologists as commentators.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 456

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.