Political Psychology

By Kristen Renwick Monroe | Go to book overview

Contributors

C. FRED ALFORD is Professor of Government and Distinguished Scholar– Teacher at the University of Maryland, College Park. He coedits the Psychoanalysis and Society Series at Cornell University Press and has served on the Governing Council of the International Society for Political Psychology. Author of ten books on moral psychology, Alford's most recent works compare Western and Eastern concepts of evil: What Evil Means to Us and Think No Evil: Korean Values in the Age of Globalization. Alford has just completed a study of the ethics of whistleblowers, Whistleblowers' Lives: Broken Narratives and Total Organizations.

DANIEL BAR-TAL is Professor of Psychology at the School of Education, Tel Aviv University. He served as the president of the International Society of Political Psychology (1999–2000). His research interest is in political and social psychology, studying societal beliefs regarding conflict, delegitimization, security, patriotism, and siege mentality. He authored Group Beliefs and Shared Beliefs of a Society, and coedited Social Psychology of Intergroup Relations, Stereotyping and Prejudice, Patriotism in the Lives of Individuals and Nations, and Concerned with Security: How Children Understand War and Peace.

MARTHA CRENSHAW is John E. Andrus Professor of Government at Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Connecticut. She is a member of the Executive Board of Women in International Security and past president of both the Political Psychology section of the American Political Science Association and the International Society of Political Psychology. Her research centers on the problem of political terrorism. For example, she is the editor of Terrorism in Context and the author of an article on terrorism for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Psychology, published jointly by the American Psychological Association and Oxford University Press.

MORTON DEUTSCH is Professor Emeritus and Director Emeritus of the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers

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