Political Psychology

By Kristen Renwick Monroe | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Locators annotated with f indicate Wgures.Locators annotated with t indicate tables.
A
A priori reasoning, research rejection of, 295, 343, 370–371
Ability, in opinion formation, 235–238, 239f, 240
Absolute sovereign, 196
Abstract principles
cross-disciplinary integration of, 345–346
modernist views on, 352, 356
research methodology for, 277–279, 295
Accuracy, in political learning, 111–113
Actor(s)
individuals as political, 20–21
informative behavior of, 300–306
perceptual bias of, 306–308, 400
importance of others, 407–409
self-conceptualization and, 405–407
problems faced by, 296–298
Adaptation, as cultural function, 124–126, 134
Addiction, power as, 391, 391n
Adjustment, in opinion formation, 240–241
Affect, see Emotion(s)
Affirmative action, long-term consequences of, 258
Agency—structure relationship, in social life, 335n–336n
Agenda setting
as election issue, 216–217
as framing issue, 148, 253, 256
political events effect on, 7
for political psychology, 385–386
Aggression, power vs., 386–387
Anchoring, in opinion formation, 240–241
Anthropology, political psychology link to, 4, 24, 54, 62, 80
cultural foundations of, 133–136
disappearance of, 108, 110, 122
Antiwar movements, 263
Assimilation, cultural context of, 132, 135
Atomic bomb, 24, 393–394
Attachment, group psychology of, 198, 201– 203
Attitudes and attitude response process
commonalism in, 182–184
political applications of, 6, 142–143, 188–189
integrated understanding of, 335–337
in political opinions, 7–8, 81–82
as individual factor, 146–147
to long-term events, 255–256
in policy issues, 87–89
political events effect on, 7, 51
toward candidates, 227, 231–234
toward policy issues, 227–231
research methodology for, 272, 274, 277, 279–282
societal transmission of, 157–159, 162
Attribution theory, of Signals, 305n
Authoritarianism
postmodern challenges of, 318–319, 347n
as research component, 9, 25, 76, 158, 176, 378

-439-

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