D

D --In music, the second tone of the scale of C, or the fourth tone of the A minor scale; any printed or written note representing this tone; the key, pipe or string of any musical instrument tuned to this note. Also, the abbreviation found in music notation, deriving from the Italian da or dal, meaning by, for, from, or of.

Dabber --(1) A pad used by engravers, etchers, etc., to apply ink or color in even distribution. (2) In painting, a large round brush, usually of camel hair, used in smudge and stencil work.

Dabbous --A rattle type of musical instrument of Turkey, used by dervishes. A knobbed stick is hung with chains finished with loosely-attached bits of sonorous metal that strike together musically when the stick is whirled.

Dabog --In Slavonic art and mythology, the god (see Bog) of sun and fire, and the giver of life and progress, engaged in a never-ending struggle with Stribog, a hostile deity, god of storms. Also spelled Dai-Bog.

Dacca muslin --The finest and most delicate of all cotton fabrics, made in the Indus Valley of India from the long, fine cotton yarn of that area. As early as the 17th century, pieces 15 yards long and one yard wide, without seams, were made there. See cotton.

Dactylic meter --In religious music, a type of meter in hymns corresponding to musical triple time in which each line starts with an accented syllable, as in Heber's BRIGHTEST AND BEST OF THE SONS. Compare with amphibraic and anapaestic (qq.v.).

Dactylion --A mechanical device designed to strengthen the fingers and render them independent of each other for piano playing. The apparatus consisted of ten rings, each attached to a steel spring hanging above the keyboard, each of which accommodated one finger. See also chiroplast and finger trainer.

Da-daiko --A drum-type musical instrument of Japan, used only upon occasions of high imperial importance. The drum was surrounded with a broad rim ornamented with phoenixes and dragons, painted red to represent flames. It was set upon a special platform, draped and tasseled, provided with a railing and steps of gold. The last da-daiko in existence was lost in a shipwreck at the turn of the 20th century, en route to a European exposition. The phoenix (q.v.) is widely used in the decoration of musical instruments, its figure symbolizing immortality.

Dadaism -- A movement in painting, sculpture and literature which began officially in Zurich in 1916. Its philosophy involved a complete nihilism, satirical disillusionment, violent protest, disgust with and ridicule of civilization, iconoclastic destruction, programmatic disorder, systematic demoralization, and a glorification of the irrational or anti-rational, and antiesthetic, and the amoral. Generally considered to be a revolt against the "senseless holocaust" that was World War I. Frequently found release in collage (q.v.), employing violent humor and devastating irony. Tristan Tzara was prominent in the origin of the movement which developed

-203-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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