E

E --In music, the third tone in the scale of C major, or the fifth tone in the relative minor scale of A minor; the string, key, or pipe of any musical instrument tuned to this note; the third tone of the scale, called mi. This scale is considered the typical diatonic scale because it requires no sharps or flats to bring out the succession of tones and semi-tones necessitated in the making of a complete diatonic scale.

Ea --In Babylonian art, religion, and mythology, the god of water, of the arts, and of the sciences.

Eagle wood --A variety of timber used in fine inlay work; better known as aloes wood (q.v.).

Ear-boxing dance --See örfiladansen.

Ear-dishes --In metalwork, shallow plate. like dishes of old Europe having flat, projecting handles suggesting the name.

Early American --A furniture period embracing the years 1620 to 1725, featuring straight lines of simple, sturdy, practical proportion. The favored materials were oak, maple, pine and ash, and the principal upholstery fabric was chintz. In modern use these pieces are employed to best advantage when placed against rugged backgrounds. This period was followed by the Colonial (q.v.).

Early Bronze Age --A term in popular archaeological use referring to the period 3000 to 2000 B.C.; however, it does not appear that bronze was known at the time. It is the age in which the first organized states appeared in Egypt and Mesopotamia, and can be said to mark the beginning of the historical period. Monumental architecture (including the pyramids of Egypt), statuary, and inscriptions occur, and mental activity was turned into a wide range of channels, including production of great epics, e.g., the Sumerian creation and flood stories. The period showed the genuine signs of development into realms of social idealism.

Early English --The pointed style of medieval architecture succeeding the Norman at the close of the 12th century. It is characterized by purity and simplicity of lines, combined with delicacy, refinement and grace. The columns and shafts are more slender than those of the preceding style; the moldings are more delicately curved, alternated with hollows to give full effect to light and shade; the capitals frequently have the form of an inverted bell; the towers are loftier and are often crowned by spires; the buttresses project boldly; the vaults are groined, and the wall-arcades often have their spandrels filled with sculpture. The most distinctive features of the Early English style, however, are the pointed arches and the long, narrow, lancet-headed windows, without mullions. Toward the end of the period the windows became grouped in a manner that led to the development of tracery, and the transition to the Decorated Style followed. Known also as First Pointed and Lancet Style.

Early Iron Age -- An archaeological period following upon the Late Bronze Age (q.v.), and covering the years 1200 to 900 B.C. Properly referred to as First Iron Age (q.v.).

Early Paleolithic --First and oldest of the three subdivisions of the archaeological

-236-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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