F

F-- In music, the fourth tone in the scale of C major, or the sixth tone in the rela- tive scale of A minor; any note, printed or written, designating this tone; any key, pipe or string of a musical instrument tuned to this note.

Fable-- In literature, a short narrative in which some moral truth or principle is explained by means of a story. Although the original purpose of the fable was to make clear an abstract idea to undeveloped minds, it may, if properly and skilfully written or told, interest even the wisest of persons. Its purpose in the present day is as much to amuse (as in moving picture cartoons) as to instruct. The collection of AESOP'S FABLES remains the perennial classic.

Fabliau-- A short tale in verse, originating in medieval France, containing not more than 400 lines. It gave comic treatment to incidents of middle-class life in keen, gaily satiric, often coarse style, later merged with fable. The pious variety of fabliau was known as conte-dévot (q.v.). Often accompanied by music, it was exceedingly popular among 12th and 13th cent.trouba- dours; mentioned by Scott in his introduc- tion to SIR TRISTRAM ( 1804).

Fabric-- A broad term of general inclu- sion, embracing all types of cloth made of threads that have been woven, knitted, or felted together.

Fabric painting-- A term in Chinese art; see chêng.

Fabrikoid-- An imitation leather.

Fabula praetexta-- In theatre, a Roman, historical type of drama first written by Naevius who was imprisoned for the political references therein. A famous ex- ample is OCTAVIA, author unknown, extant in its entirety.

Fabula saltica-- In theatre, a Roman ballet pantomime. Lucan ( 65 A.D.) wrote a partly preserved libretto in which the actor gesticulates and dances; the chorus chants the text.

Fa-burden-- See fauxbourdon.

Façade-- In architecture, a general term applied to the exterior of a building, esp. the front or more important face; that face of a structure usually containing the principal entrance.

Face-- A term in architecture; see façade.

Face-- In fabrics, the right side of the cloth, as distinguished from the wrong, or under side.

Face--- In printing, (1) the impression sur- face of a printing or type plate; (2) a particular size or style of letter cast in type, as distinguished from another size or style, e.g., plain face, bold face, light face, etc.; (3) the front or printed side of any sheet.

Facet-- In architecture, the flat projection between the flutings of a column.

Facets-- In lapidary art, the 'small faces' (French facette, diminutive of face) into which the surface of a precious stone is divided to add depth and to allow for the multi-colored reflections with which a well-faceted gem scintillates. Compare with cabochon.

Facia-- A term in architecture; see fascia.

Facial angle-- Angle formed by the cross- ing of the axis of the face with the axis of the skull. Frequently set down by painters

-260-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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