G

G --In music, the fifth tone in the scale of C major, or the seventh tone in the relative A minor scale; any note, printed or written, designating this tone; the key, pipe or string of any musical instrument tuned to this note.

Gable --In architecture, (1) the upper part of an end wall, above the level of the eaves, beneath the end of a ridge-roof that is not hipped or returned on itself; usually triangular; the triangle of wall surface formed by the meeting of two sloping roof lines; (2) any gable-like member; (3) the entire end wall of a building.

Gable roof--In architecture, a ridge-roof terminating in a gable (q.v.).

Gaboon --A term in woodworking; see mahogany.

Gabri --Exquisite pottery of 11th and 12th cent. Persia, excellently colored, sgraffito carved, and in deep relief decoration; known also as yastkand (q.v.).

Gadroon --In metalwork, a geometric ornament consisting of curved lines radiating from a common center, the spaces between them generally being repoussé (q.v.). Also spelled godroon. In wood- working, any notching or carving in a rounded molding; a reeding or fluting, usually almost oval.

Gadulka --The Bulgarian form of violin. It is a three-stringed instrument shaped somewhat like a small mandolin; the melody is played (by bow) on one string only, the other two functioning as drones.

Gaged brick --In architecture, a type of brick made in the general shape of a wedge, to conform to the radius of the soffit of an arch. Used also in the construction of vaults and other features requiring a curved surface. See leather-edged brick and concave brick.

Gaida -- A primitive musical instrument used by Bulgarian peasants. Essentially a home-made bag-pipe, it is found chiefly among the Balkan and Western Slavs.

Gaine --In sculpture, the lower part of a figure of which the head alone (occasionally extending to the bust) is carved to represent nature; the remaining portion presents the appearance of a sheath closely enveloping the body, and is consequently broader at the shoulders than at the feet. Sometimes the feet are shown at the bottom of the gaine, while above them the solid lines of the squared or circular sheath continue up to the chest or head. A simple comparison can be made to the mermaid. Found most frequently in Archaic Greek and Egyptian architectural sculpture.

Gai saber --See saber.

Gaku --In Japanese art, a panel-painting mounted and enclosed in a frame; any framed picture. Known also as gakumen.

Gakumen --In Japanese art, any framed picture. See gaku.

Galalith --A plastic substance, non-inflammable, having numerous uses in the arts, esp. in decorative work on small objects, e.g., inlay, mosaic, etc. Its unusual texture adapts it as an excellent substitute for ivory, tortoise-shell, bone, ebony, amber, and the like. Chemically it is a formaldehyde casein, galalith being a trade name.

Galanty show --In the 19th century English theatre, a technique consisting of throwing the shadows of puppets on a

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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