H

Haarlem School --A Dutch school of art centering in Haarlem; its chief characteristic was the truthful representation of garden backgrounds in painting, first introduced by Dierick Bouts. This school was a forerunner of painting schools and movements that were to flourish in great number in Holland in the 17th century.

Ha-ash --A term in Egyptian funerary archaeology; see seven holy oils.

Habaki --In the making of Oriental swords (q.v.), a metal stop fitting both sides of the blade to keep the sharp edge from dulling by contact with the hilt or scabbard.

Haban --In ceramics, the excellent grade of pottery ware made by a group of Anabaptists who settled in Slovakia in the mid-16th century.

Habanera --A dance in 2/4 meter popular in Havana; frequently syncopated and performed in a slow, voluptuous manner.

Haboki --A feather brush used to dust up the ashes of the furo (q.v.) or fire brazier in the ceremony of a formal Japanese tea.

Hachsharah --In Israel, the general term referring to the preparation, training or education taken in contemplation of pursuit of any of the arts; extended through use to include non-artistic vocations.

Hachures --In cartography and surveying, short parallel or slightly divergent lines running in the direction of a slope; used for indicating relief on a map. Also, short lines used in drawing and engraving to create the same effect pictorially. Known also as hatch lines.

Hacking --In gem cutting, a series of cuts in a metal lap to serve as receptacles for the falling abrasive powder.

Hackmatack --In architecture, a variety of cross-grained timber excellently suited to exterior work; see larch.

Hadad --A Babylonian-Assyrian god of good and evil, commonly known as Adad (q.v.).

Hadán --The call to prayer in India and Egypt; a chant which is sung five times daily from the towers or minarets of the mosques. The muezzin (crier) performs this function at dawn, noon, 4 P.M., sunset, and nightfall.

Hades --A term in mythology; see Pluto.

Hadrian --See pantheon.

Haevka --In Ukrainian music, the Easter carols that originated in pre-Christian days. Many are of a pagan and ritualistic nature, having survived the efforts of Christianity to suppress them.

Hagag --Ancient Hebrew dance term occurring in the OLD TESTAMENT; see mahol.

Haggadah --In religious literature, the report of the exodus of the Jews from Egypt as traditionally told on the Passover evening. This was written and illustrated more frequently than any other Jewish text during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Haggum --A bowed-string musical instrument of Korea consisting chiefly of a cylindrical body of wood with a slender bamboo neck. It is similar to the erh-h'sien (q.v.) of China, and is played in the same manner.

Hagioscope --In architecture, a small, oblique window in a medieval church, through which the altar was visible.

-318-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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