N

Nablium --A musical instrument of the ancient Hebrews; it had ten strings which were plucked with the fingers. Known also as nebel and nebel nassor.

Nachayama yaki --In Oriental ceramics, a variety of decorated household pottery made in the Tosa province of Japan.

Nachung --The most influential among the many oracles and prophets of Tibet. Goes into a trance once each month, 'looking into the future' and guiding the affairs of these highly superstitious people.

Nacre --(1) Resembling pearl, as in iridescence or luster; nacreous, as the nacre enamel found on Belleek porcelain. (2) Same as mother-of-pearl (q.v.).

Nada --In the music of India, the word employed in describing sound in an esthetic sense only, having no application to noise, clang, grind, etc. Generally, pleasant sound.

Naga --In Sanskrit, the serpent; an important element in Oriental art, frequently represented in Cambodia and India.

Nagara --A large kettle drum of India, beaten with two curved sticks; restricted to temple use.

Nagare --A drum-type musical instrument of old Persia, better known as dimplipito (q.v.).

Nagasaki School --A Japanese school of painting, named after the city of its origin; emphasis was placed on the imitation of Chinese painting styles, materials, and subjects.

Nagasaki ware --In Oriental ceramics, an excellent grade of lacquered porcelain first produced in the vicinity of Nagasaki, Japan. The desoration was applied to glazed porcelain blanks by lacquer artists.

Nagelgeige --See nail violin.

Naggareh --A musical instrument of old Syria and Arabia consisting of a small brass double drum in the form of kettle drums. The parchment head is beaten with wooden drumsticks. Known also as nakkarah.

Nag-pheni --A cup-mouthpiece musical instrument of India consisting of a trumpet the tube of which is bent in the shape of the letter S near the blowing end; expands into a bell at the lower end. Known also as turi.

Naif --Having a natural luster before cutting and/or polishing; e.g., a naif gem. As naife, the term refers (esp. in Mexico and Spain) to any diamond in the rough; corresponding term in Portugal is nayfe.

Nailhead molding --In architecture, a form of molding common in the Romanesque style, so named from being cut into a series of quadrangular pyramidal projections resembling the heads of nails.

Nail violin --A musical instrument invented in 18th century Russia consisting of a circular sound box of wood, in the circumference of which iron pins were inserted, diminishing in height as the tones rose in pitch; sympathetic strings were later added. Because of the resisting quality of the nails, a coarse black horsehair bow was used. Some authorities find evolutionary relationship with the African zanze. Known also as Nagelgeige.

Nakago --The shaft or tang of a Japanese sword, often ornately engraved; fits into the handle or hilt.

Nakkarah --See naggareh.

-455-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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