P

Pac --In costume art, a type of moccasin with the edges of the sole turned up and sewed to the upper section; also, a heavy, felt-lined half-boot worn by loggers and trappers of northwestern Canada.

Pacatamente --In music notation, a term directing the performer to execute the composition (or passage thereof) in a calm, quiet, placid manner.

Pa-chiao-kou --A drum-type musical instrument of China consisting of an octagonal frame of wood having parchment heads, with metal discs attached to the sides. It is strongly suggestive of the tambourine (q.v.).

Pad --In the piano, a cushion of soft felt attached to the butt end of a hammer. It is with the pads that the strings are struck.

Padalon --The Hindu hell, situated under the earth; a deity guards each of its eight gates.

Padauk --In woodworking, a coarse-textured timber deriving from the PTEROCARPUS family, used extensively for turnery, carving, veneering, piano cases, balustrades, furniture, parquet, paneling, and interior fittings. It has interlocked grain, lightcolored sapwood and red to red-brown heartwood. It turns, cuts, and finishes well. Known also as Andaman padauk.

Padded leather --In bookbinding, leather bindings containing cotton, blotting paper, wool, or other padding between the leather and the boards.

Paddle -(1) In ceramics, a bat or pallet used for the mixing and tempering of clay. (2) In glass-making, a scoop-shaped device at the end of a long handle, used for stirring the molten glass.

Paddle and anvil method --In ceramics, a primitive technique employed in the making of pottery. Found to have been used in the Mogollon Culture (q.v.).

Paddle step --In ballet, a movement starting from the third or fifth position. The dancer pushes on the ball of the rear foot, at the same time sliding forward on the ball of the front foot. It is accented by striking the floor with the front heel as the rear foot is extended sharply backward and raised. May also be executed toward either side.

Padhati --In the music of India, a system of composition, or formula designed to bring the music into the desired form, e.g., the kirtan, bhajan, khayal, etc. The precision of Indian songs requires almost mathematical construction.

Padiglione --Literally, butterfly. The bell of a wind instrument; i.e., the wide, flaring opening at the far end of a horn.

Pad seat framing --A term in furniture; see seat frame.

Pad stone --See template.

Paduan --A curious device in numismatics consisting of an imitation coin. Any one of the replicas of Roman bronze coins and medallions, esp. those made in the 16th century by Giovanni Cavino, assisted by his friend A. Bassiano, both of Padua, Italy. These pieces were struck in copper, in an alloy, or in silver, and were designed openly as works of art only, not as counterfeits or forgeries.

Paduasoy --In fabrics, a strong, smooth, rich silk, originally manufactured at Padua, Italy, used for garments of both women

-490-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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