Interpreting Literature with Children

By Shelby A. Wolf | Go to book overview

BOOKS FOR THE PROFESSIONAL

Bruner, J. (2002). Making stories: Law, literature, life. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. A prominent psychologist and eminent educator, Jerome Bruner is a critical voice in understanding narrative. In a landmark volume—Actual Minds, Possible Worlds (1986)—he explored how actions in the real world co-exist with mental processes that help interpret their meaning. This later volume explores the pivotal role of stories in the laws we live by and the lives we lead, marked by predictable patterns and, even more important, unexpected events.

Calkins, L. M. (2001). The art of teaching reading. New York: Longman. This beautifully written book explores the teaching of literature with a comprehensive perspective—ranging from guided reading and phonics to talking about literature as well as nonfiction. As a master teacher, Lucy Calkins brings her considerable knowledge to the literary table and delivers a persuasive message about the power of children's interactions with text.

Lewis, C. (2001). Literary practices as social acts: Power, status, and cultural norms in the classroom. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. In a year-long ethnography of a fifth-sixth-grade classroom, Cynthia Lewis provides an enlightening view of the highly social nature of literary interpretation through four classroom practices—read-alouds, peer-led as well as teacher-led literature discussions, and independent reading.

Peterson, R., & Beds, M. (1990). Grand conversations: Literature groups in action. New York: Scholastic. Though this book is small in size, the scope is indeed “grand” as the authors explore children's meaning making potential through rich dialogue about story.

Routnian, R. (2000). Conversations: Strategies for teaching, learning, and evaluating. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Packed with myriad ideas, strategies, and examples, Regie Routman's text provides a comprehensive look at fine literary teaching.

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Interpreting Literature with Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Prologue: Engagement Beyond the Edges of the Earth 1
  • I - Salutations! Learning About Literature *
  • 1 - Critical Perspectives 9
  • Books for the Professional 40
  • 2 - Literary Elements in Prose & Poetry 44
  • Books for the Professional 87
  • II - Ways of Taking from Literature *
  • 3 - Talking About Literature 93
  • Books for the Professional 128
  • 4 - Culture & Class in Children's Literature 131
  • Books for the Professional 164
  • 5 - Gender in Children's Literature 167
  • Books for the Professional 195
  • III - Ways of Doing Literature *
  • 6 - Interpreting Literature Through Writing 201
  • Books for the Professional 222
  • 7 - Interpreting Literature Through the Visual Arts 225
  • Books for the Professional 252
  • 8 - Interpreting Literature Through Drama 255
  • Books for the Professional 281
  • Epilogue: How like the Mind 284
  • References 290
  • Credit List 306
  • Index 309
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