Interpreting Literature with Children

By Shelby A. Wolf | Go to book overview

8
Interpreting Literature Through
Drama

My mom: “When are you going to stop moping and go out and play?”

Me: “Who am I going to play with?”

My mom: “I see lots of kids down there. All colors and sizes. They look great to me. ”

Me: “But I don't know any of those kids…. ”

My mom: “Well, you never will if you don't go out. Kids won't come to our door just seeking out the famous and beautiful Elana Rose Rosen. ”

Me: “I didn't say they would. ”

My mom: “Elana, please! Did I say you said it? And don't start to cry! I have too much to do to get involved in scenes with you. I have to get us settled. Find a job. Get ready for my courses. ”

Me: “Just leave me here alone then. ”

My mom: “But it breaks my heart to see you standing on that scooter, moping. ”

Me: “I'm not moping. ”

Finally my mom came right up behind me and put her hands on the handlebars and pushed me and the scooter out our front door and down the hall and into the elevator and out the elevator and through the lobby. Then she gave me a big push that sent me out the front doors…

—Williams (1993, pp. 2–3)

In raising the curtain on this final chapter that features literary interpretation through drama, it's symbolic that the spotlight shines on the “famous and beautiful Elana Rose Rosen”—the heroine of Vera B. Williams' extraordinary novel, Scooter. Elana is perfect because she is such a dramatic soul. Even more important, she's an honest one, and drama is all about truth, or at least,

-255-

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Interpreting Literature with Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Prologue: Engagement Beyond the Edges of the Earth 1
  • I - Salutations! Learning About Literature *
  • 1 - Critical Perspectives 9
  • Books for the Professional 40
  • 2 - Literary Elements in Prose & Poetry 44
  • Books for the Professional 87
  • II - Ways of Taking from Literature *
  • 3 - Talking About Literature 93
  • Books for the Professional 128
  • 4 - Culture & Class in Children's Literature 131
  • Books for the Professional 164
  • 5 - Gender in Children's Literature 167
  • Books for the Professional 195
  • III - Ways of Doing Literature *
  • 6 - Interpreting Literature Through Writing 201
  • Books for the Professional 222
  • 7 - Interpreting Literature Through the Visual Arts 225
  • Books for the Professional 252
  • 8 - Interpreting Literature Through Drama 255
  • Books for the Professional 281
  • Epilogue: How like the Mind 284
  • References 290
  • Credit List 306
  • Index 309
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