R

Ra --In Egyptian art and religion, the ancient god of the sun. See Aten.

Raban --A small East Indian drum, beaten with the hands; the more ornate varieties resemble the tambourine (q.v.).

Rabbate --In literature, esp. poetry, the shortening of a word, usually for purposes of rhyme or meter. May occur anywhere in the word, e.g., at the beginning ('tween), in the middle (o'er), or at the end (morn).

Rabbia --In music notation, a term directing the performer to execute the composition (more often only a passage thereof) with rage, fury, madness or violence, subordinating time and form to the full expression of emotion.

Rabbit --See rebate.

Rabelaisian --In literature, pertaining to or after the style of the writings of Rabelais, distinguished by exuberance of imagination and language, combined with coarseness of humor, satire and extravagance. Passages in Linklater's JUAN IN AMERICA may be described as rabelaisian.

Rabot --In sculpture, a hardwood block used in the polishing of marble.

Rack --In painting, a 19th century device consisting of a stone or wood tablet having a number of grooves running lengthwise, in which brushes were placed. Used chiefly by water-color and miniature specialists, it kept the wet brush tips from each other and from rolling.

Rack --An instrument of torture by means of which the limbs were pulled in different directions, so that the entire body was subjected to great tension, often sufficient to cause the bones to leave their sockets; the form of application differed during various eras. The rack consisted essentially of a platform on which the body was placed, having at one end a fixed bar to which the legs were fastened, and at the other end a movable bar to which the other limbs were affixed. The 'pulling' was effected by means of a windlass.

Rackett --An obsolete musical instrument of German origin, similar to the bassoon; it had a weak tone, brought about by the numerous curves. Also known as rankett and wurst fagott (q.v.).

Raddle --See ruddle.

Raden --A Japanese lacquer technique. Patterns of metal and mother-of-pearl (q.v.) are inlaid in the lacquered surface. Known also as kanagai.

Radiograph --A photograph taken by X-ray, more correctly called a shadowgraph. In no manner is a camera used in the process.

Radomirsko --A Bulgarian folk-dance in the general pattern of the horo, esp. popular in the Sofia area. The combination of long and short beats brings forth a series of irregular but pleasant steps and movements in true alla zoppa (q.v.) character. Usually performed in 9/16 meter.

Raeren stoneware --In ceramics, a variety of grès cérame having a lustrous brown salt glaze and applied relief decorations, made at Raeren, near Aix-la-Chapelle (in the ancient duchy of Limburg) during the 16th and 17th centuries. Among the most famous objects are jugs with relief friezes representing peasant dances. See stoneware.

Raffia --A fibrous material deriving from

-567-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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