T

Ta-amin --In religious music, an important melody in Jewish cantillation (q.v.).

Taaweesh --A bulbous variety of war club used by the Indians of North America; frequently carved with totemic figures for spiritual aid in combat.

Tabard --In costume art, originally a light garment worn over medieval armor, embroidered with the coat-of-arms of the wearer. Worn now only by the token guards of kings, embroidered with the arms of the sovereign. Known also as surcoat.

Tabaret --In fabrics and furniture, a heavy silk cloth having satin stripes, generally used for upholstery. Sometimes spelled taberray.

Tabbalat --A drum-type musical instrument of old Arabia. Played by hand, it consists of a shallow shell of wood and is carried about the neck. A pair is known as tabbalat arrakeb. Known also as tablshamee.

Tabby --In the architecture of Morocco, a mixture of lime with shells, gravel, or stones in equal proportions, with an equal proportion of water, forming a mass which dries to the hardness of rock. Used as a substitute for bricks or stone in building.

Tabernacle --Any canopied altar, recess or niche used as a repository for a treasured or sacred relic or object. Also, a portable tent used by the Jews as a temple prior to settlement in Palestine; hence, any Jewish temple. See baldachin.

Taberray --See tabaret.

Tabinet --In fabrics, a variety of material made of silk and wool in combination to resemble fine poplin or damask. Though exceedingly popular for upholstery and drapery at one time, it has been out of style and practically obsolete for a number of years.

Tabl --A drum used by the ancient Egyptians, made from a hollowed block of wood or from an earthenware vessel, over the opening of which a head of skin was stretched. It was struck with the fingers and wrists.

Tabla--In India, a percussion instrument resembling the tom-tom of the Africans and American Indians. However, only the right hand is used in beating it. The cylindrical shell of wood or metal has heads of parchment braced at the sides with strips of skin which pass over wooden tubes placed midway between the heads to regulate tension. The custom is for these drums to be tied about the performer's waist.

Tablature --In music, a system of notation. From the 15th to 18th cent., different methods of note-writing were employed; e.g., the music for the lyre was written in signs and symbols different from those used for that of the flute, and each style was a tablature. In modern music, the uniform system of sign and staves is used. The sol-fa system was a tablature invented in the 19th century.

Tablature --In sculpture and carving, any surface (usually stone) sufficiently smooth and hard for the receiving of lettering; a plaque before application of the inscription; any surface suitable for permanent marking, as a tombstone, historical marker, etc. Loosely, any painting on a tablet, wall, or ceiling.

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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