X

Xabardillo --(Literally, 'little crowd') In the customs of Spain, a company of strolling musicians, chiefly instrumentalists. Sometimes found, even today, in Mexico and in some sectors of southwestern U.S.

Xabega --An ancient musical instrument of the Moors. Little is known of its construction; however, the similarity in name to the xabeha, or Moorish flute, gives rise to the belief that it was probably a wind instrument.

Xabeha --A flute-type musical instrument of the Moors, occasionally seen in some parts of Spain. See also xabega.

Xacara --In music, (1) a type of romantic melody; a rustic tune used for dancing and singing; also, the term applied to the dance itself; (2) a Spanish company of youths strolling about during the evenings singing such airs. Also spelled jacara.

Xänorphica --A musical instrument of the keyboard class, now obsolete, invented in Vienna, 1797. When the keys were depressed the strings were forced against revolving bows set into motion by treadles; there was a bow for each string. Its complicated structure was the chief reason for its fall into disfavor.

Xanthian Sculptures --Name given to a large, famous series of exquisitely executed pieces of statuary discovered during excavation operations at the site of Xanthus, ancient capital of Lycia which fell to Cyrus' army in 546 B.C., and again to Brutus in 42 B.C. The sculptures, chiefly sepulchral, include some of the world's rarest examples of detailed relief work in stone. The collection is now in the British Museum. Sometimes referred to as Xanthus Sculptures.

Xanthic --A general term applied to any plant, mineral, etc., used as a source of yellow coloring matter, or to the yellow color itself; specifically, the fine yellow hue contained in madder (q.v.).

Xanthocyanopsy --A form of color-blindness (q.v.) in which the only visual power present (with respect to color) is the ability to distinguish yellow and blue; vision for red is lacking. Although generally recognized as embracing insensitivity to red light-waves only, some authorities persist in the belief that this affliction includes green-blindness as well.

Xanthometer --An instrument in the nature of a scaled colorimeter, employed in determining the precise hues of liquids.

Xanthopsy --A type of color-blindness (q.v.) in which all objects seem to take on a yellow tinge; known also as yellow vision. Sometimes spelled xanthopsia.

Xanthorhamnine --A fine yellow coloring matter, originally of secret origin, but discovered by the Greeks to have been made by Orientals from ripe Persian or Turkish berries, and from Avignon grains.

Xanthorrhea gum --A natural resinous product derived from the Australian XANTHORRHEA tree, used widely in the sizing of paper and manufacture of various waxes. Used also as a surface film or coating applied to paintings and statuary.

Xanthosiderite --A variety of ocher (q.v.), golden brown to yellow, occurring as a mineral in fine needles or fibers, concentric in structure.

Xanthus --In Greek mythology, the horse

-782-

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Dictionary of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 119
  • D 203
  • E 236
  • F 260
  • G 290
  • H 318
  • I 343
  • J 359
  • K 368
  • L 385
  • M 411
  • N 455
  • O 471
  • P 490
  • Q 562
  • R 567
  • S 605
  • T 692
  • U 744
  • V 751
  • W 767
  • X 782
  • Y 785
  • Z 792
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