Lost Paradises and the Ethics of Research and Publication

By Francisco M. Salzano; A. Magdalena Hurtado | Go to book overview

PREFACE

“Bioethics, ” a term created by Van Rensselaer Potter in 1971, has been a source of increasing concern over the past three decades. The rights of the underprivileged or especially vulnerable persons, such as children, elders, ethnic minorities, or members of a specific gender, have been explicitly stated in a series of documents, issued by UNESCO and several other national and international agencies. An important aspect of this problem relates to the ethics of biomedical research in human populations, and particularly in those with distinct, preindustrial forms of subsistence. Biomedical investigators should strictly conform to these norms, therefore avoiding any harm to the groups they are going to study. But ethical principles are also applicable to other professionals, such as those who propose to describe the scientific findings to the lay public, as well as those responsible for the dissemination of these evaluations in the media.

These considerations, which may be perfectly obvious to most biological scientists, became the subject of scrutiny beginning in August of 2000, when an announcement was sent to a large number of scholars via the Internet describing Patrick Tierney's book Darkness in El Dorado: How Scientists and Journalists Devastated the Amazon (Norton, New York, 2000). The announcement included terrifying revelations about unethical behavior conducted by anthropologists and geneticists among the Yanomamö.

-vii-

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Lost Paradises and the Ethics of Research and Publication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Contributors xiii
  • Part I - Lost Paradises *
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • References *
  • Part II - Historical Contexts *
  • 2 - Voices of the Dead: James Neel's Amerindian Studies 27
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 3 - James V. Neel and Japan 49
  • References *
  • Appendix 56
  • 4 - Politics and Science 59
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Why Genetic Studies in Tribal Populations? 70
  • References *
  • Part III - Epidemiological Contexts *
  • 6 - Emerging Health Needs and Epidemiological Research in Indigenous Peoples in Brazil 89
  • References *
  • 7 - The Nexus of Yanomamö Growth, Health, and Demography 110
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Disease Susceptibility Among New World Peoples 146
  • References *
  • 9 - Public Health and Adaptive Immunity Among Natives of South America 164
  • References *
  • Part IV - The Future *
  • 10 - The Ethics of Anthropological Research with Remote Tribal Populations 193
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 11 - Conclusions 211
  • References *
  • Index 229
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