Lesson Study: A Japanese Approach to Improving Mathematics Teaching and Learning

By Clea Fernandez; Makoto Yoshida | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

We wish to express our sincerest gratitude to Jim Stigler who helped plant the seed for the initial idea for this project and played a major role in bringing it to fruition. We are also deeply indebted to Alan Schoenfeld for his very able assistance and incisive comments in every step of the writing process. Alan not only helped us substantially improve our manuscript but we both learned a great deal from working closely with him.

Many thanks are also due to the teachers at Tsuta and Ajinadai Nishi Elementary Schools. They not only graciously let Makoto into their inner circle to observe Lesson Study practice first-hand, but they welcomed him wholeheartedly. These teachers also spent many tireless hours answering his queries and sharing their stories about lesson study. We thank them for their time, wisdom, and friendship. Without their help, this study never would have been possible.

An invaluable informant and one that Makoto remembers with great fondness is Ms. Reiko Furumoto, who at the time of data collection was the vice-principal at Tsuta Elementary School. She was a caring individual who devoted all her energy and knowledge to helping teachers grow professionally and who cared deeply about students. Unfortunately, Ms. Furumoto passed away this past year when she was still on duty as a principal at Asahara Elementary School. We are greatly saddened that Ms. Furumoto can not celebrate our achievement of publishing this book with us. However, we find comfort in the thought that her commitment to improving education and the professional lives of teachers will be passed on through this book to lesson study practitioners in the United States. We dedicate this book to Ms. Furumoto.

Makoto also thanks his parents for their patience and support since the onset of this project. They have his deepest gratitude for all their sacrifices, hard work, and worry. Without their unwavering belief in his potential, he never would have been able to achieve this milestone. Unfortunately, Makoto's father passed away while this book was still in

-xiii-

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