Lesson Study: A Japanese Approach to Improving Mathematics Teaching and Learning

By Clea Fernandez; Makoto Yoshida | Go to book overview

7
Preparing to Teach the Study Lesson

TOUCHING UP THE LESSON PLAN

Before Ms. Nishi taught the study lesson on November 15, she and Ms. Tsukuda took care of revising their lesson plan. These revisions included detailing certain parts of the plan that they previously did not have a chance to work through, as well as modifying this plan based on ideas that came up when discussing it with other members of the lower group. Their revised plan is presented in Fig. 7.1 with changes relative to the first draft highlighted in gray. Interestingly, one modification missing from this plan was to revise the introductory part where the students and their past learning experiences were described. This new version of the plan was still based on Ms. Tsukuda's class because Ms. Nishi had not had the time to change this section. Although next we briefly point out some of the more noteworthy changes that the teachers did make to the plan, we encourage the reader to study this document to uncover the other minor alterations made by these two teachers.

The first major change made by these teachers was that they included a diagram in the section called “related items, ” which had previously been left blank for later completion. The diagram, which was constructed using the reference section of the Teacher's Instructional Manual (Gakkotosho, 1992), placed this lesson in the context of 5 years of elementary curriculum. More specifically, it showed how units on addition and subtraction taught in the first grade relate to other units taught between second grade and fifth grade, allowing all the teachers to situate the lesson relative to the material that they were responsible for teaching.

Second, the teachers added a section entitled “The Goals of this Lesson' and deleted the section called “Perspectives on Evaluation, ” which was incorporated into the new section about goals. Once the teachers had specified their objectives for this lesson, it made sense to evaluate the lesson based on these lesson goals.

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