Lesson Study: A Japanese Approach to Improving Mathematics Teaching and Learning

By Clea Fernandez; Makoto Yoshida | Go to book overview

12
Sharing Reflections
About the Study Lesson

Unlike when Ms. Nishi taught the subtraction study lesson, where only members of the lower grade group and the principal got together to share their observations, all the Tsuta teachers, the principal, the vice-principal, and Mr. Saeki attended the debriefing meeting that followed Ms. Tsukuda's lesson. This meeting, which was held in the staff room (see Fig. 12.1), began and ended with brief remarks from the school's principal.

The bulk of the meeting was devoted to discussing first Ms. Tsukuda's lesson and then a third-grade study lesson that was also taught on that day. Mr. Saeki was also asked to provide comments and suggestions. The conversations about each of these lessons were structured in the same way. They began with the teacher who had taught the lesson providing reactions, which were then followed by a whole-group discussion. The meeting lasted 2 hours and 20 minutes. The teachers spent about 50 minutes discussing each lesson. Mr. Saeki's remarks, plus the principal's opening and closing comments, lasted about 30 minutes. The head teacher, Mr. Mizuno, was in charge of facilitating the proceedings. We next provide an account of this entire meeting except for discussions and comments made specifically about the third-grade study lesson.


MR. YAMASAKI'S OPENING REMARKS

The principal's brief opening remarks began with him thanking all teachers for participating in the study lessons. He also thanked Mr. Saeki for coming to the school to observe the lessons and the lower and middle grade teachers for their efforts in developing these lessons. He next made a few brief comments about the two lessons taught that morning. In reference to Ms. Tsukuda's lesson, he said that he thought that the first-grade students were paying attention to what their teacher was saying during the lesson and that it looked to him as if they were learning every step of

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