The Nemesis of Power: The German Army in Politics, 1918-1945

By John W. Wheeler-Bennett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
FROM THE SEIZURE OF POWER TO THE DEATH OF HINDENBURG (January 1933-August 1934)

(i)

ADOLF HITLER, when he became Chancellor in January 1933, had a pronounced complex against Generals. From the earliest days of the National Socialist movement every successive attempt to achieve power had been prevented by a General; at the end of every avenue there had appeared a bemonocled figure in field grey, and claret- coloured trouser stripes, with uplifted hand, crying 'Halt!'.

For, though Hitler and the NSDAP had owed their early survival and development to the secret aid and succour of the Reichswehr, this assistance had always been given for the advantage of the Army and not for the benefit of the Party. Whenever Hitler had attempted to depart from his rôle, first of satellite, and, later, of junior partner, he had found the Generals ranged against him.

It was a General, von Lossow, who had first patronized, then betrayed, and finally fired upon Hitler at Munich. It was a General, von Seeckt, who had steadfastly opposed the March on Berlin. It was a General, Gröner, who had suppressed the paramilitary organizations of the Party; and though another General, von Schleicher, had coquetted with the Party, had negotiated with Hitler and, in the chaotic fantasy of the last days of January 1933, had even contemplated a coup d'état to make the Führer Chancellor, Hitler remembered the earlier attempts of this General to split the Party, and recognized full well the fundamental hostility which von Schleicher and von Hammerstein entertained toward National Socialism. Hitler had not been deceived by the manœuvres of January 29. He appreciated fully the motives which had inspired the projected Putsch -- the desire for revenge upon the Hindenburgs and von Papen, and the intention of bringing the Nazis to power as the captives of the Army rather than of the Conservative Right -- and was well aware that his own beaux yeux did not figure among them. He knew also that the General, von Blomberg, who had

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Nemesis of Power: The German Army in Politics, 1918-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 832

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.