Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History

By Fawn M. Brodie | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I must acknowledge several different kinds of indebtedness in this volume. First of all, I owe an obvious intellectual debt to Jefferson scholars Dumas Malone and Merrill Peterson, whose writings have illuminated Jefferson's political genius. My portrait of Jefferson the man differs, however, in important respects from theirs, and differs also from the shorter but provocative analysis by Winthrop Jordan in White over Black. I also found particularly useful the eighteen volumes of the Jefferson Papers, edited by Julian Boyd, and the special volumes of Jefferson letters edited by James A. Bear, Jr., and Helen Bullock.

For new information on the life of Maria Cosway, I am grateful to Superiora Suor Enrica Cozzi for permission to examine the Cosway papers at the Collegio di Maria SS. Bambina, Lodi, Italy, and to the librarians at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, for permission to consult the Douce manuscripts. For many personal courtesies at the University of Virginia and at Monticello I am indebted to Dumas Malone, Merrill Peterson, James A. Bear, Jr., William H. Runge, and William G. Ray. My special thanks go to Roy P. Basler, Director of Manuscripts, Library of Congress, for rushing a special copying of three hundred letters from Jefferson to his son-in-law. For additional aid I wish to thank Natalie Schatz of the Harvard College Library; J. A. R. Wilton of the British Museum; Mary Isabel Fry and Ray Billington of the Henry E. Huntington Library; Stephen T. Riley of the Massachusetts Historical Society; Alfred Bush of the Princeton University Library ; Allen T. Price of the Ohio Historical Society; Ray O. Hummel of the Virginia State Library; and the photoreproduction department of the Virginia Historical Society.

John Maass traced the whereabouts of the original of Adriaen van der Werff's painting, Sarah, Abraham, and Hagar. Harold J. Coolidge kindly gave me permission to quote a portion of a letter written by Ellen Randolph Coolidge.

I am grateful to Page Smith, as well as Winthrop Jordan and Bernard

-17-

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